Jersey Shore Socked – Why?

Why “Stronger than the Storm” ads didn’t help the Jersey Shore?

Now that Fall has officially begun – let’s talk about this past summer. Everyone knows that Hurricane Sandy definitely created havoc all over the tri-state area last year, including the Jersey Shore. In fact, storms of all shapes and sizes, during all seasons have always posed a risk to communities coast to coast. What has typically happened in the past is that the particular communities come together, slowly re-build, and hope for the best. Although I think an interesting trend is actively taking place, especially over the past 10 years or so.

Here is a sign NJ Transit was touting the “Jersey Shore” over at the Lackawanna Train Terminal.

Jerse Shore Fail

What was the real reason the Jersey Shore was down?

A recent “news” article said Jersey Shore revenues were down 40 percent “in spite of pricey ad campaign.”

You can also read that differently: “We spent $25 million dollars of taxpayer money to get taxpayers to spend more money at the Jersey Shore,” right? Makes you wonder if they should have just given the $25 million directly to affected people? Who knows. Maybe they had a “projected ROI” because of the “feel good” nature of commercials like this?

Poll: Jersey Shore Fail

For one, I know of many people who became a bit disgusted by the incessant marketing of “rebuilding” and “stronger than the storm” messages – because human suffering and extreme weather events are nothing new.

What IS new is the widespread marketing of such disasters, with “victims” seeking out sympathy and contributions from areas far and wide. And the marketing is also going on longer and longer and longer – often years beyond the actual event. You can thank technology, social media and much more for that.

But at what point is it enough already?

How can you expect the Jersey Shore to quickly get back to normal, when there are many factors at play? The residents of the area have their own issues to deal with, the economy is getting worse for everyone, and people are finding other things to do besides the worn out, stereotypical “shore” retreats.

The Jersey Shore Ad Campaign Failed Because:

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Accepting risk and the ups and downs?

Some discussions I’ve had with logical people have centered around the obvious choices people make. Like living in certain areas of Hoboken. Most people are aware (or quickly become informed) that the city is in a low-lying area, and has certain risks. You hope for the best, but prepare for the worst?

When times are “good” down at the shore (or anywhere else for that matter) – and businesses are prospering – you don’t hear much about it. We don’t hear how much their profits were higher than last year, or the year before. Or how thankful they are – and how much money they, as a community, donated to let’s say – the ski areas that “suffered” because of a lame snow season. But when they are down on their luck – everyone cries.

In the long-term – things ought to even out, you have good years, great years, average years and bad years. Sort of what life is all about, no? Perhaps oremus pro invicem should be enough?

Here’s another one of the “Stronger than the Storm” ad campaigns. At least the company that made them and the TV stations profited.

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3 Comments on "Jersey Shore Socked – Why?"

AM1245
Member
AM1245

Just wanted to add… Much of the Jersey Shore business’s are cash businesses, which I think means they have the discretion to under report their earnings during a “bad” year. This brings me to wonder, how bad of a summer was it really?

homeworld
Member

It’s a “cash” business all right: http://hoboken411.com/archives/9601

Specifically quarters. [quote comment=”221712″]Just wanted to add… Much of the Jersey Shore business’s are cash businesses, which I think means they have the discretion to under report their earnings during a “bad” year. This brings me to wonder, how bad of a summer was it really?[/quote]

nbm3
Member
nbm3

I’m sure most of them being a cash business, means they have the discretion to under report earnings during a “good” year. Nothing to under report if you didn’t make it in the first place[quote comment=”221712″]Just wanted to add… Much of the Jersey Shore business’s are cash businesses, which I think means they have the discretion to under report their earnings during a “bad” year. This brings me to wonder, how bad of a summer was it really?[/quote]

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