Hoboken School Funding Fight in NY Times

12/12/2007:

hoboken-connors-school.jpgToday’s New York Times identifies Hoboken as the center of the battle over how New Jersey calculates state aid for schools. Critics say Hoboken’s revitalization is in sharp contrast to it’s reliance on Abbott School funding for impoverished districts. Hoboken officials say the city does not get as much Abbott Funding as other districts with a large population of low income students enrolled in the school district. Today’s article with the headline “Hoboken’s Rebirth Fuels School Aid Formula Fight” notes how far the city has come since it was first identified as an “Abbott District”:

“Hoboken’s rags-to-riches transformation is often cited by critics of New Jersey’s so-called Abbott system, in which 31 historically poor urban school districts receive the bulk of state school financing, to illustrate its shortcomings. Cities like Hoboken, these critics say, are no longer impoverished enough to merit special treatment.”

In the article Republican Assemblyman Bill Baroni points to Hoboken as “exactly why we need a new school funding formula,” while Abbott funding advocate David Sciarra calls criticisms of Hoboken a “red herring” because the district receives so little Abbott aid. The Times also notes the real estate renaissance has not led to a revolution in the school system:

“In Hoboken school officials said that a majority of their students come from housing projects, not the upscale condos whose owners often send their children to private or parochial schools. Seventy-five percent of the district’s students are poor enough to qualify for free or reduced lunch, the seventh-highest level among all Abbott districts, according to state statistics.”

hoboken-high-school-sm.jpgThe Times article quotes schools Superintendent Jack Raslowsky, who says Hoboken accepts $4.2 million in Abbott funding for preschool programs as part of$12.4 million in state aid within a $54 million budget. The story also notes the plight of students from the HHA who attend Connors Elementary School, and includes a link to an interactive map comparing the statistics of school districts throughout New Jersey. Roll your mouse over Hoboken and you will find some thought provoking stats, including:

  • Hoboken has the 3rd highest average teacher salary in the state at $76,806.
  • Average spending per pupil of $19,363 is the 4th highest in the state.
  • The student-teacher ratio of 9.3 in 410th out of 512 districts.
  • 446th in the state for 4th grade Language skills
  • 425th in the state for 4th grade math skills

Leave a Reply

44 Comments on "Hoboken School Funding Fight in NY Times"


SWHotty
Member
SWHotty
8 years 8 months ago

Less Abbott $ for Hoboken schools. Thanks Corzine!
nytimes.com/2008/01/08/nyregion/08l...&ref=nyregion&oref=slogin

matt_72
Member
8 years 9 months ago
[quote comment=”58643″]Matt, Matt Matt: Do you really think Hoboken schools would be better if there were one school board and one superintendent for the whole county? What keeps Hoboken on the up and up at all is that some regular folks schlep to city hall for a council meeting or Clinton St. for a BOE meeting. If you combined every municipality in the county you wouldn’t lose one job. Which police dept would be cut? Which firemen would lose their jobs? And then my H.S. kid would go to Ferris and my kindegartner to somewhere in Union City? Why not have one BOE for the whole state? That would save millions, right?, and corruption would disappear. Just like in the NYC schools.[/quote] I grew up in a county that had something like 600-700K or so people, well over 100 schools (including 21 high schools) and 1 police and fire department. All elementary schools were within walking distance for most kids, but you were bused to the HS & MS (but they were much bigger schools than in NJ – economies of scale). There were multiple police and fire houses, but only 1 organization (maybe 3 police stations and 20 or so fire houses). 1 Superintendent, 1 Police Chief, 1 Fire chief, 1 HR department, 1 accounting department, 1 purchasing department, 1 county executive and county council, etc…. This area I grew up in was outside a major city (like Hoboken) that had high crime and poverty rates. This area I… Read more »
Amandla
Member
Amandla
8 years 9 months ago

Matt, Matt Matt:
Do you really think Hoboken schools would be better if there were one school board and one superintendent for the whole county? What keeps Hoboken on the up and up at all is that some regular folks schlep to city hall for a council meeting or Clinton St. for a BOE meeting. If you combined every municipality in the county you wouldn’t lose one job. Which police dept would be cut? Which firemen would lose their jobs? And then my H.S. kid would go to Ferris and my kindegartner to somewhere in Union City? Why not have one BOE for the whole state? That would save millions, right?, and corruption would disappear. Just like in the NYC schools.

Katie_Scarlett
Member
8 years 9 months ago

[quote comment=”58343″]or any of the sentences handed down in the 1800’s; “hung by the neck until you are dead, dead, dead!”
yup, the good ‘ole days…[/quote]
Hee, yes, those are fun to read (or hear, as in Young Guns II, at which time Billy replies, “You can go to hell, hell, hell!”

In the last decade, Judge Kent in Galveston Texas has always been a fun read. An example:

“Both attorneys have obviously entered into a secret pact — complete with hats, handshakes and cryptic words — to draft their pleadings entirely in crayon on the back sides of gravy-stained paper place mats, in the hope that the Court would be so charmed by their child-like efforts that their utter dearth of legal authorities in their briefing would go unnoticed. Whatever actually occurred, the Court is now faced with the daunting task of deciphering their submissions. With Big Chief tablet readied, thick black pencil in hand, and a devil-may-care laugh in the face of death, life on the razor’s edge sense of exhilaration, the Court begins.”

He’s quite hilarious, but I did hear somewhere that he’s toned it down quite a bit.

strand tramp
Member
strand tramp
8 years 9 months ago

or any of the sentences handed down in the 1800’s; “hung by the neck until you are dead, dead, dead!”
yup, the good ‘ole days…

wpDiscuz