Gifted & Talented Hoboken students

11/19/2007:

This note was sent in by Hoboken411 reader Jean Marie Mitchell:

Saturday U Students

“This past Saturday morning at 9am, Jack Raslowsky visited the Hoboken Public Schools’ Saturday U program held at the Hoboken High School. He made a special visit for the children to congratulate them on their achievements and to encourage them to continue their spark for learning.

The program consists of children from grades 3-6 who have tested as advanced proficiency in the standardized NJ ASK test with a score of 250 or above. It is a 16-week program of accelerated academic and liberal arts courses. The classes are held in the Hoboken High School. They take courses in Math & Finance, Computer Animation, Fine Arts, Science & Geography, Language Arts, and Latin Dance. The children attend the courses from 9 a.m. – 12 noon every Saturday. At the end of the program, the children go on a field trip, receive a certificate of achievement, and are treated to a barbeque luncheon. Last year the children went to tour the American Museum of Natural History and attended the Space show at the Hayden Planetarium in the Rose Center for Earth and Space.

Pictured are many of the students in the program along with Gary Enrico, the program director, and Jack Raslowsky, Superintendent of the Hoboken Board of Education.”

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37 Comments on "Gifted & Talented Hoboken students"

purple68
Member
purple68

Journey – You’re absolutely right. I am glad to hear that your academic needs were met, and you were able to have a successful school career. I do mean that with all sincerity. I like to hear those kinds of success stories.

I stand by my original point though – small class sizes do not represent a statistically significant sample size when it comes to standardized test scores AND in many instances, there is a correlation between the number of special needs kids and low(er) test scores.

Sorry if I offended you.

Journey
Member
Journey

I had an IEP. I got extra time for tests and was not allowed to participate in sports where I would be blind-sided (meaning I was in non-standard gym). I took the SAT at the Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired’s offices. It was untimed and for the English portion I had a proctor who read the test out loud.

I had over 1300 back when the max was 1600. (I can’t remember the exact numbers from the two times I took the test.) It was good enough to get 3 academic scholarships. Good enough to go to Oxford for a summer on a scholarship.

Having IEP does not mean bringing the class average down.

Litterboken
Member
Litterboken
First of all, if a kid cannot do well on the tests, they are not required to take them: “In New Jersey, students with disabilities must participate in each subject area assessment of the NJ ASK, GEPA and HSPT11/HSPA unless the student’s IEP team determines that the student (from http://www.state.nj.us/education/specialed/sas_brochure.htm🙂 * has not been instructed in any of the knowledge and skills tested; and * would not be able to do the types of items on the assessment.” Also, kids with IEPs have all different kinds of disabilities. Having an IEP does not make a kid mentally retarded. Things like a specific learning disability, trouble handwriting, attention deficits, even cerebral palsy can be grounds for an IEP so long as the student has special needs. So, assuming for the moment that your theory (and are there any facts to back it up?) is correct, what does it say about the schools that students with special needs are scoring so poorly?[/quote] Kids with IEPs (Individualized Education Plans, for those who don’t know) are mainstreamed, and in the regular ed classes the teacher is required to make certain modificiations, like giving them fewer homework problems, not counting spelling as a factor in grading, rephrasing instructions, etc. Stuff that can, in no way, get to the heart of why the child has an IEP in the first place. I, as a teacher, can’t fix this kid. Ever, maybe, but certainly not when I have 25 other kids who need my attention as well… Read more »
bunbury
Member
bunbury

As an aside, I recognize at least two of those kids and I know for a fact that they don’t live in Hoboken.

It feels good to see our tax money hard at work.

purple68
Member
purple68
Cat – Let me try to explain what I mean. When the kids take the standardized NJ tests, ALL the scores for the class (including the kids who have special needs) are lumped together to get the percentages that are listed on the State of NJ Education website (and published in the newspapers). When you examine those scores more closely (you can click on subgroups), you can see how many of those kids are in general education (non IEP). For privacy purposes, they will sometimes not tell you the number of kids with special needs, but it’s pretty easy to do the math. If 22 kids were tested, and 14 are in general education, that leaves 8 in special education. That means 36% of the class *might* not score very well, depending on why they have an IEP. As for why the students with special needs are scoring badly, I have no idea. It’s possible it’s not even the kids with special needs that are bringing the test scores down — it could just be regular ed kids who are just not that smart, but don’t need classification. I wasn’t putting down special ed students — I was just trying to say that when you have a high percentage of special ed students in a small class, the results may not be reflective of the true picture. And again, I’m no statistics expert, but I’ve got to believe a small sample size (30 or less) is not statistically significant. If… Read more »
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