Hoboken Stoop Loitering

Letter: Loitering on stoops in Hoboken is a menace

One uptown Hoboken resident that lives near 12th & Hudson is getting a bit sick of the loitering that’s happening now that the weather has been warm.

“I have begun to notice an increasing amount of loitering around stoops. In particular my stoop (an Applied building), I addressed the issue with the management company and was instructed to contact police as they have posted no loitering signs.

I would typically not make a fuss over this matter until it becomes a problem trying to walk up my stoop and find myself forced to weave and dodge people sitting and smoking on the stoop. Also people in this building who have children, allow them to loiter with friends throwing balls on the sidewalk hitting cars and people. I was forced to address these teens when one of them decided to make a comment about my girlfriend as she attempted to enter the building. I am sure this is an issue else where in Hoboken and hope management companies as well as police make greater efforts to limit this practice.”

How do you feel about loitering? Is it menacing? Or a reminder of days past when people actually talked face to face and knew everyone in the neighborhood?

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35 Comments on "Hoboken Stoop Loitering"

MidnightRacer
Member

There’s a famous quote I think most people know…

“The right to swing my fist ends where the other man’s nose begins.”
– U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

Otherwise know as, one person’s freedom ends where another person’s begins.

There’s no issue if freedom is not infringed. So when you block someone’s passageway and ignore a polite excuse me, or if you merely lean over and put the cost on the walker to figure out a way through, then you’ve infringed on that person’s freedom by defining yours as comfort and laziness at the cost of others. This applies to blocking stoops, sidewalks, and doorways. There is no excuse. But, there are those who resort to personal attacks to attempt to justify the means (blocking others) by pointing at the ends (kill yuppies).

CraftLass
Member
CraftLass

I absolutely agree with SBCEA on this. There is a big problem with newcomers to this city wanting to change things to suit their clearly suburban desires. I used to live in Hell’s Kitchen, where the people who hung out on my stoop were mostly smoking a lot of crack. You know what? They were far more delightful than the influx of richer people and tourists due to gentrification who thought they owned the whole neighborhood, the stoop hangers even helped me out in some dangerous situations just because I didn’t bother them about hanging out. Even if someone on your stoop is being rude you might be amazed what a bit of politeness and thoughtfulness can do. Calling the police without trying to settle the matter person-to-person or even just being rude in return only adds to the conflict in the long run. If other efforts don’t help and it becomes truly threatening, sure, then you have to bring in officials, but very few cases need to go that far.

The best part of Hoboken life is the neighborliness within a city that has lots going on. Let’s not let small problems destroy that. Gated communities are a better place to be if you want to be completely left alone.

joey maxim
Member
joey maxim

box or slap ball four corner sewer plates were the bases,jonny on the pony,moons up and ringalario…mom always knew where you were.most kids today are on all these new cell phones and x box games..go with the flo…no more cockeye hennies,or presties store for
sodas. 68 fun but we move on..we will survive..

escaped68
Member

I lived on park ave and we had a nonstop stickball game, it started after school and went on to the lights went on. 4 on a side and when your mother called you for dinner you left and someone took your place and when you can back you waited for a opening and you took his place. We chipped in for a spaulden high bouncer and “borrowed” somebodys broom handle and if the ball went down the sewer we used a clothes hanger to fish it out. And if we couldn’t “borrow” a broom we played punchball. No uniforms, no rules, no adults,except for a occasional old guy who though he could still hit, we just played,times were much simpler and in many ways better. [quote comment=”215671″]box or slap ball four corner sewer plates were the bases,jonny on the pony,moons up and ringalario…mom always knew where you were.most kids today are on all these new cell phones and x box games..go with the flo…no more cockeye hennies,or presties store for sodas. 68 fun but we move on..we will survive..[/quote]

MidnightRacer
Member

the mentality = temporary paraplegia

It’s the same mentality of those who block the centerlines of sidewalks Friday and Saturday nights when they could easily stand by the building out of the passageway.

Whether stoop, sidewalk, or bus seat, you say excuse me, and they lean over (maybe).

pawzclawz
Member
pawzclawz

I was born and raised in Union City. I have no problem with children playing on the sidewalks. I love hanging with my landlords and neighbors on their stoops and mine. I am a renter in a brownstone uptown. I have been through too much to get rattled. I was going out one evening a few years ago. There was a young couple having a conversation on my stoop. They did not live there obviously. I came out of my house. They looked at me and said “We’re sorry” They still did not move. I said “Don’t apologize just move.”

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