Storm Clouds over Hoboken

7/21/2009:

Long before “Mashups” became halfway noticeable in our country – I was a huge follower of the UK scene (even spinning them into my rotation back when I DJ’d in Hoboken – people were “confused” back in the late 90’s).

Still one of my all time favorite mashup artists is Mark Vidler – of Go Home Productions.

Little did I know he was also an accomplished musician! His “long-awaited” album can be downloaded from his website starting tomorrow, July 22nd.

And he even wrote a song about our very own Hoboken!

mark-vidler-go-home-productions-the-future-the-past-and-the-present-tension

“The Future, The Past & The Present Tension”

Mark writes:

“Finally, after promising a full album of original material for 2 years, a Vidler / GHP long player is in the can. Called “The Future, The Past & The Present Tension” it was conceived between December 2008 and March this year. 14 tracks all written, played, recorded and produced by yours truly and it will be released as a free download via this very website 22nd July 2009, via Fluicidal Recordings.

Musically it’s a melting pot of primary influences that have invaded and taken settlement in my brain since childhood, combined with whatever I was ‘feeling’ during the 4 months of studio time. In layman’s terms you may well find flavours of XTC, Dukes Of Stratosphear, Beatles, Small Faces, Syd Floyd, Beefheart, Ivor Cutler, Brian Wilson, My Bloody Valentine, Julian Cope, Tom Waits etc.

It’s not an album to soundtrack your club-going habits. It’s more of a ‘head’ album than a ‘feet’ album I guess. The album cover has a definitive message..”

What’s the story about this Hoboken track?

“Storm Clouds Over Hoboken” is an instrumental track that I pieced together in March this year. It’s centered around a piano hook that I was playing around with for a few days that quickly developed into a jazzy ‘soundtrack’ vibe.

I kept getting flashbacks of my trip to NYC in fall 2004, yellow taxis, police sirens, smokey sidewalks. I guess that the track has a slightly sombre, foreboding feel to it. Close your eyes and you can almost taste the rain that’s about the crash down… I was in Hoboken on that trip in 2004. I met up with Ken, Irwin and all the guys & girls at WFMU – had a great time.

I’d like to think of this as a kind of musical “thank you!”

Hear “Storm Clouds over Hoboken” here:

A bit more about his musical history

When I asked how long Mark had been a musician – I was surprised to learn that he picked up the guitar at the ripe age of 13, so his musical roots are well planted. He even bought a sitar last year – which he’s currently learning (he’s picking up on the George Harrison / Traffic vibe now too).

In the early 1990’s he played with a band called Chicane – and was part of the “shoegazing” scene in the UK: Ride, My Bloody Valentine, Catherine Wheel, Lush and so on. They released 5 EP’s and a full length album. He said they got moderate UK radio airtime. See the rest of Mark’s story here.

Good luck with the new album, Mark – and thanks for remembering Hoboken!

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3 Comments on "Storm Clouds over Hoboken"

diamondjoe
Member
diamondjoe

wow. thanks for this righteous info. I’ve been a big fan of GHP since I heard “Ray of Gob.” I haven’t been to his site since “Spliced Krispies” came out last year. I highly recommend folks going and downloading all you can.

Thomas Jefferson
Member
Thomas Jefferson

I listened to the first two minutes of that song, and the best I can say, without being offensive, is that it was insipid fluff.

In response to diamondjoe who said:
wow. thanks for this righteous info. I’ve been a big fan of GHP since I heard “Ray of Gob.” I haven’t been to his site since “Spliced Krispies” came out last year. I highly recommend folks going and downloading all you can.

Thomas Jefferson
Member
Thomas Jefferson

No righteousness was intended, and no info was posted.

It’s just that, musically speaking, that tune doesn’t go anywhere, and it reminds me of noodling on an instrument without any musical goal.

If you like it, knock yourself out with it because, as Chuck Berry sang in “My Ding-A-Ling”, “… it’s a free country.”

In response to Thomas Jefferson who said:
I listened to the first two minutes of that song, and the best I can say, without being offensive, is that it was insipid fluff.

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