The Pickens Plan

7/14/2008:

Here’s a good national topic we can all discuss: Dependency on foreign oil.

A Hoboken411 reader forwarded some info on the Pickens Plan (harnessing alternate power sources), and thought it’d be a good topic for this week.

America is addicted to foreign oil

pickens-plan.jpg

It’s an addiction that threatens our economy, our environment and our national security. It touches every part of our daily lives and ties our hands as a nation and a people.

The addiction has worsened for decades and now it’s reached a point of crisis. In 1970, we imported 24% of our oil. Today it’s nearly 70% and growing.

As imports grow and world prices rise, the amount of money we send to foreign nations every year is soaring. At current oil prices, we will send $700 billion dollars out of the country this year alone — that’s four times the annual cost of the Iraq war.

Projected over the next 10 years the cost will be $10 trillion — it will be the greatest transfer of wealth in the history of mankind.

America uses a lot of oil. Every day 85 million barrels of oil are produced around the world. And 21 million of those are used here in the United States.

That’s 25% of the world’s oil demand. Used by just 4% of the world’s population.

Can’t we just produce more oil?

World oil production peaked in 2005. Despite growing demand and an unprecedented increase in prices, oil production has fallen over the last three years. Oil is getting more expensive to produce, harder to find and there just isn’t enough of it to keep up with demand.

The simple truth is that cheap and easy oil is gone.

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117 Comments on "The Pickens Plan"

jscirish27
Member
jscirish27

I try to do most of my shopping at the Union Sq. Greenmarket. It is open MWF&S and has a great selection of locally farmed produce and meats. I also use Shop-Rite for certain staple items (oils, etc). Also, check out shop-rite during certain seasons and you will find local stuff being sold. Whole Foods occasionally, but not as a matter of course. I like Fresh Direct as well.

Eatwild.com is a website dedicated to finding local farmers as well. It is well worth the effort for taste, quality, and health to try and seek out the best local stuff you can when it is in season.

Katie_Scarlett
Member

[quote comment=”93917″]prehistoric agrarian cultures are gone dude. india has 2.4% of the worlds land and almost 18% of the world human population est to be 1.15 billion….growiing to 1.33 billion in the next 10yrs. their birth rate is more than 3 times their death rate. without industrial farms in the United States going 24/7/365 the recent food riots in SE Asia will look like pillow fights compared to the slaughters that will be forthcoming. china will be much worse.[/quote]
the answer is: FORCED STERILIZATION

Hobo91
Member

jscirish27 – thanks for all the insight.

can i ask where you do most of your shopping?

strand tramp
Member
strand tramp

prehistoric agrarian cultures are gone dude. india has 2.4% of the worlds land and almost 18% of the world human population est to be 1.15 billion….growiing to 1.33 billion in the next 10yrs. their birth rate is more than 3 times their death rate. without industrial farms in the United States going 24/7/365 the recent food riots in SE Asia will look like pillow fights compared to the slaughters that will be forthcoming. china will be much worse.

jscirish27
Member
jscirish27
My last word on this topic as follows. The ultimate goal of agriculture is sustainability. Small farms with many different crop varietals and animals have proven to function more like a natural ecosystem, ie. the woods. They have proven sustainable over the centuries. Industrial farming is relatively new (post WWII). It relies on chemicals, pesticides, and genetic modification (not through evolution mind you) that fundamentally changes soil pH and the nature of the crops themselves. Maybe the worldwide famine will result in an overdependance on method that has not been proven sustainable over time. Industrialized agriculture will always exist in the US, but I would like to see it move from a primary option to a second or third option. Much like the original topic of this thread, energy consumption, we need to move off of oil as our primary fuel and find clean alternative methods (not corn based ethanol). Of course organic/local food costs more right now, but most of that is because it doesn’t have as sophisticated of a distribution network. If local farmers could work in guilds and co-ops the prices would eventually drop. The other thing would be attitude change. Americans would have to respect seasonality more. No January tomatoes or asparagus. This isn’t always easy in a country where we are used to always getting our way. Matt, as far as the exercise v. food debate in obesity, it is both, but the processed food has become far unhealthier. When we were kids, coke was… Read more »
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