Reader Mail: Dangerous Dogs

3/7/2008:

Here’s today’s reader mail about the etiquette you’re supposed to have when you own a deranged and dangerous dog:

Rude dog walker with dangerous dog

“This morning around 6:45 I took my dogs out for a walk and a trip to the dog park. While they were peeing on the curb in front of my apartment, I woman walking her dog walks up the sidewalk and appears clearly aggitated once she gets to me and my dogs (there was plenty of space to pass and I even pulled one over a little more so she’d have more room). She huffed out a rude ‘excuse me’, allowing her dog to tough noses with mine as she walked by.

angry-hoboken-dog.jpg

Once my dogs were done, I started walking up my street towards the dog park, with this woman being in front of me when I started–I passed her as we were crossing a street, she sighed heavily, looked at my with a clearly annoyed expression, and muttered some words that I hope I heard incorrectly. She then muttered (again, low enough that it wasn’t easy to hear) that her dog would attack my dogs (now this dog wasn’t growling or showing any other threatening behavior that would clearly indicate his potential issue with other dogs, so it’s something she would have had to articulate to me in our previous encounter). Once I heard that, I told her she shouldn’t be walking them near me (she had every opportunity to say that her dog wasn’t friendly, and had the chance to cross the street rather than allowing her dog to walk within inches of mine when she first encountered me, even allowing her ‘dangerous’ dog to touch noses with mine).

People–if you have dogs that are possibly a danger to other dogs, PLEASE clearly let it be known to those you encounter. Dogs are all over the place in this town–people with dogs that don’t get along with others are generally good–pulling theirs to the side and announcing to me as I approach that their dog isn’t good with other dogs..allowing me to keep mine to the side and not let them enter the other dog’s personal space).

It is YOUR responsibility to protect others from your dogs potential problems. Don’t act annoyed with me when I happen to be using the sidewalk–it isn’t your personal property. Speak up CLEARLY so that I know your dog is a possible danger to mine and don’t be so rude. Keep YOUR dog away from others–this woman could have easily crossed the street once she saw my dogs exit my apartment building–she was a half block away!

30 Responses

  1. Friedupright says:

    Dogs on leashes can be very vulnerable and will often act differently than they would when they are free to sniff butt, walk away, etc. It’s called “leash agression.” When you are walking your dog on leash, it’s important to keep the dog near you, within a couple of feet. You have no idea how another dog might react. Monitor both dogs when approaching. A direct stare into the eyes by either of the dogs and stealth like movements could mean a potential show down. A direct stare by a dog is like saying, “bring it on.” Hackles up on either dogs, a tail between the legs, or a tail not wagging “could” indicate a problem. Talk to the owner, as well. “Is your dog friendly?”

    Of course, the vast majority of dogs in this town are fine. They love being around other dogs and are more than happy to greet an oncoming dog. It’s pretty easy to see when two dogs are going to be OK with each other. Tails are wagging, one or both are submitting to the other, etc.

    Now, as for the rest….. If you really and truly encouter a “dangerous” dog, the proper thing to do would be to report the incident to the Health Department – Frank Sasso. His job would be to evaluate the situation and perhaps demand that the dog where a muzzle in public. (Note, the encounter in this blurb does not justify a call to the Health Department. I see the same encouters with baby stroller. People can be rude. Sorry to bring up strollers AGAIN.)

    Also, don’t think that just because it is a certain kind of dog, like a pit bull, that it is a dangerous dog. Dogs are dogs, like people are people. There are dangerous dogs and dangerous people and you can’t tell just by looking at them what they are like. Watch, think, talk – and walk away if you have to. Your chances of being hurt by a person is far more likely than your chances of being hurt by a dog – but it happens.

  2. Friedupright says:

    Before I am called out for spelling errors by *sum of you who like to play English teacher — I type really, really fast and when typing, sometimes will type “where” instead of “wear” because my mind is already a sentence ahead and my fingers are just typing the sounds in my head. Right. OK, then. Let’s move on.

  3. 9 says:

    Like I said in my earlier post, owners need to have a clue. I knew my old roommate’s dog (all 13 pounds of her, but still) was a risk to attack other animals. So I paid attention, kept her away from other dogs and warned other dog owners who started approaching that my monster wasn’t friendly. I love dogs and didn’t want another pet’s injury on my conscience.

  4. bradykp says:

    [quote comment=”72274″]Dogs on leashes can be very vulnerable and will often act differently than they would when they are free to sniff butt, walk away, etc. It’s called “leash agression.” When you are walking your dog on leash, it’s important to keep the dog near you, within a couple of feet. You have no idea how another dog might react. Monitor both dogs when approaching. A direct stare into the eyes by either of the dogs and stealth like movements could mean a potential show down. A direct stare by a dog is like saying, “bring it on.” Hackles up on either dogs, a tail between the legs, or a tail not wagging “could” indicate a problem. Talk to the owner, as well. “Is your dog friendly?”

    Of course, the vast majority of dogs in this town are fine. They love being around other dogs and are more than happy to greet an oncoming dog. It’s pretty easy to see when two dogs are going to be OK with each other. Tails are wagging, one or both are submitting to the other, etc.

    Now, as for the rest….. If you really and truly encouter a “dangerous” dog, the proper thing to do would be to report the incident to the Health Department – Frank Sasso. His job would be to evaluate the situation and perhaps demand that the dog where a muzzle in public. (Note, the encounter in this blurb does not justify a call to the Health Department. I see the same encouters with baby stroller. People can be rude. Sorry to bring up strollers AGAIN.)

    Also, don’t think that just because it is a certain kind of dog, like a pit bull, that it is a dangerous dog. Dogs are dogs, like people are people. There are dangerous dogs and dangerous people and you can’t tell just by looking at them what they are like. Watch, think, talk – and walk away if you have to. Your chances of being hurt by a person is far more likely than your chances of being hurt by a dog – but it happens.[/quote]

    this person knows dogs! great post

  5. Tama Murden says:

    Re 24.: From this & other posts, Friedup often gets the gestalt of dogs.

    Fried’s got it that part of how dogs react to other dogs, especially on leash, is how WE react to what’s encountered on leash.

    I’ve witnessed it over & over.
    It’s always all about us communicating effectively with them.

    Dogs always key into their owners.
    They want to please us.
    Period.

    Isn’t that partly why they’ll always be better than any boyfriend or girlfriend?

    And when they’re off leash in a safe place, it can be a totally different & wonderful window into their world.

  6. justaview says:

    [quote comment=”72385″]

    Dogs always key into their owners.
    They want to please us.
    Period.

    Isn’t that partly why they’ll always be better than any boyfriend or girlfriend?

    And when they’re off leash in a safe place, it can be a totally different & wonderful window into their world.[/quote]
    Somewhere, someone totally screwed up your head! Run Fido Run! 😯

  7. hobokentownie says:

    Sounds like two bitches engaged in a cat fight.

  8. justaview says:

    [quote comment=”72419″]Sounds like two bitches engaged in a cat fight.[/quote]

    no the bitches would be the two cunts you live with your wife and your daughter fighting over who gets to go to dinner with you at the local bar! they’re both in diapers so I don’t see the difference take em both wanker. 😉

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