$10 a day challenge: 2 of 31

1/3/2008:

It’s only been two days, so I’m not sure I am truly feeling the effects of limited consumption (I’m more interested in this challenge for the time being, but it’ll surely wear thin soon enough.) Some of the reader comments include watching out for high-carb, high-sodium intake as a result of pre-packaged foods, and tips and tricks for various meals throughout the day.

Question of the day: Dieting

How many of you out there follow some kind of strict carb/protein/fat guidelines in your diet? There are so many books, theories, diets and opinions out there, which one do you believe?

It is my belief that for standard dieters, a very simple rule can be followed: If you consistently burn more calories than you consume, you will lose weight, period. I’m assuming there is some amount of activity outside total sedentary behavior. Could be as simple as walking. Any additional fitness beyond what you had previously been engaged in will only accelerate the weight loss progress. I think improving your health and body composition shouldn’t be a “quick fix” (i.e., “lose 20lbs in 4 weeks!”) but rather a slow and steady pace you can maintain for the long-haul.

Only when you reach a plateau, or want to attain some kind of “competition shape,” will a more rigid diet be required. Why regular, average people suffer through tortuous and high-maintenance diets is beyond me. Oh, and another reason I think people yo-yo on their diets is because they’re not honest with themselves. They either cheat, “forget” to count certain calories (like booze), or only stay on their diets for limited amounts of time and then give up.

What are your thoughts? Is there some truth to what I’m saying, or is there one “golden diet” that crushes all others?

See lazy mans hard boiled eggs, more cheating on the caffeine, and the rest of Day #2 of the $10/day challenge after the break. I’m doing ok so far!

edgewater-trader-joes-hard-boiled-free-range-eggs-hoboken411.JPG

(continued…)

Meal #1 (shown above):
2 ready-to-eat Trader Joe’s Cage Free organic hard boiled eggs. I know, I know, “how hard can it be to boil some eggs?” But this is the ultimate convenience. Definitely pricier that DIY, but still economical overall. 10 eggs for 3.29. Today’s breakfast cost me: $0.66

Morning beverage:
I still can’t kick the caffeine! I was going to walk to D&D, but decided that I should conserve my time while walking the dog (in shorts) and get a convenience store cup instead. Cost: $1.25

Bev #2:
I spent quite a bit of time uptown (and on foot,) so the owner of the new Liberty Gourmet let me sample yet another cup of Joe for $0.00. Thanks, Matthew!

Lunch:
Had this Trader Joe’s Whole Wheat Pita Pizza, with tomatoes, feta cheese and red onions. It didn’t knock my socks off (and my friend who bought the same thing, actually hated it,) but it was filling and semi-nutritious. I’ll take my homemade pies over this any day. Nutrition Facts: Cal-390; Fat-7g; Sodium-700mg; Fiber-6g; Carbs-66g; Protein-16g. Cost? $1.15

edgewater-trader-joes-pita-pizza-hoboken411-2comb.jpg

Snack:
Carb-lover should be my middle name. One of these Trader Joe’s Garlic Twists. They’re excellent! Toast them in the oven for 7 minutes, and they pull apart, with just the right amount of garlic & seasoning. Not overwhelming. Nutrition Facts: Cal-140; Fat-1g; Sodium 280mg; Carbs-27g; Protein-5g! Cost each? 50 cents.

edgewater-trader-joes-garlic-twists-hoboken411.JPG

Dinner:
Very basic, and lacking any vegetable matter. I was in the mood for chicken, and chicken it was. Trader Joe’s sells these pre-cooked Chicken Tenderloins (fingers.) They’re actually better than any diner in town, IMO. Not the greatest ever, but not reconstituted and all natural. A bag costs $5.99, but you get nearly two pounds of chicken. About 18 pieces per bag equates to $0.33 apiece. I ate them dry (no dipping action). Total Cost: $1.00

edgewater-trader-joes-chicken-tenerloins-hoboken411.JPG

Angry Snack:
I wouldn’t call this anything but eating out of frustration, because god damnit I screwed around with my Windows Vista when I shouldn’t have, and spent SIX HOURS fixing my PC last night. (This post was written at around 4:20am.) However, the snack actually wasn’t angry at me at all! They just sat there and waited for me to chew them. Trader Joe’s pre-cooked Turkey Meatballs are quite nice! You get a pound of meatballs for $2.69 (about 21 cents each.) My total cost? $1.05

edgewater-trader-joes-turkey-meatballs-hoboken411.JPG

Day #2 Total:
Food: $4.36
Beverage: $1.25
Total Spent: $5.61

January:
Monthly Total: $9.49
Budget Left: $300.51

I will try incorporating more vegetables in my diet! Please help!

Leave a Reply

25 Comments on "$10 a day challenge: 2 of 31"

Hoboken123
Member
Hoboken123

an easy trick for someone not accustomed to working out.. or is lacking the motivation to work out is to simply not use any escalators or elevators during this month. you may think it doesnt mean much.. but those stairs add up. it will definitely benefit.

also it is easier to go on a diet when no sweets are in site. if you want to not cheat on your diet just don’t have sweets in the house. if they are in the house and your a sweets lover you will eat them.. guarantee, but unless your borderline insane you will not go by them when your on a hardcore diet. drinkin is another issue.. because living in hoboken is tough since your surrounded by bars.

screamingindian
Member
screamingindian

Hey. yeah. you need more veggies. I think it’s easy to eat for under $10 a day. Hell, you’re pretty much proving it’s easy to eat for under $5 a day if you are willing to eat crap. The real challenge is eating for under $10 a day and actually eating healthy. Start in on the frozen veggies to begin with. Use Mrs. Dash instead of butter and cheese. And add some veggies to that pizza recipe of yours to get a few nutrients for goodness sake 🙂 (Seriously, that’s a no brainer)

mrfreddy
Member
mrfreddy

all I can says is that it works for me. I have my body composition tested on a fairly regular basis at a training studio I go to. After I started daily fasting and after I dropped 10 pounds, I actually gained a quarter pound of muscle.

My understanding is that on a low carb diet, muscle is preserved because the protein in your diet is used before your body starts consuming itself, and there is plenty of protein in my diet.

it’s hardly starvation. How can a pound and a half plus of meat daily, along with eggs, cheese, nuts, fruits, vegetables, butter, etc. be called starvation?

anyway, to lose weight, even on low carb, beyond a certain point, calories do count. The beauty of the fast method is that instead of 3 paltry and very unsatisfying 600 – 700 calorie meals and basically going hungry all the time, you have one glorious and very satisfying meal. And you really don’t feel hungry the rest of the time. Ok, maybe a bit as time to eat nears… but other than that, it’s no problem.

If I wanted to stick to under 10 bucks a day, I would load up on ground beef, chicken, and pork and top that off with vegetables and fruit. $10.00 day would be easy.

chrisjur
Member
[quote comment=”60205″][quote comment=”60137″]I’ve been low carbing for five years (eating like a caveman, as a previous commenter mentioned). Low carbing helped me easily maintain a 35 pound loss, but I still needed more. I took it to the next level with something called fast-5 (fast-5.com). In my ever so humble opinion, eating one giant low carb meal a day truly is the magic bullet. It’s way easier than you imagine (takes a week or so to get used to it), you eat a glorious feast once a day (for example, when I get home tonight, I’ll have a big ribeye steak (1 pound plus!), loads of vegetables covered in butter, cheese snacks, cashews, some grapes, etc. etc.). After a few months of this, I’ve maintained an additional 10 pound loss. Studies have shown this type of eating to improve all sorts of health markers, including, yes, your cholesterol, triglycerides, and other technical stuff that’s over my head.[/quote] Freddy, two issues with your diet: 1. It’s a starvation diet. You are eating your total calories in one meal, like a whopping 2,500 calories. If you normally eat 3,000 a day – well that 500 calories loss will help you lose weight. 2. Like I wrote before, you HAVE to be losing muscle mass with this, along with fat. Everyone is different, maybe you are a genetic freak that retains his muscle and loses only fat. The majority of people will not respond this way. The majority of people, on a starvation… Read more »
Furey
Member
[quote comment=”60137″]I’ve been low carbing for five years (eating like a caveman, as a previous commenter mentioned). Low carbing helped me easily maintain a 35 pound loss, but I still needed more. I took it to the next level with something called fast-5 (fast-5.com). In my ever so humble opinion, eating one giant low carb meal a day truly is the magic bullet. It’s way easier than you imagine (takes a week or so to get used to it), you eat a glorious feast once a day (for example, when I get home tonight, I’ll have a big ribeye steak (1 pound plus!), loads of vegetables covered in butter, cheese snacks, cashews, some grapes, etc. etc.). After a few months of this, I’ve maintained an additional 10 pound loss. Studies have shown this type of eating to improve all sorts of health markers, including, yes, your cholesterol, triglycerides, and other technical stuff that’s over my head.[/quote] Freddy, two issues with your diet: 1. It’s a starvation diet. You are eating your total calories in one meal, like a whopping 2,500 calories. If you normally eat 3,000 a day – well that 500 calories loss will help you lose weight. 2. Like I wrote before, you HAVE to be losing muscle mass with this, along with fat. Everyone is different, maybe you are a genetic freak that retains his muscle and loses only fat. The majority of people will not respond this way. The majority of people, on a starvation diet,… Read more »
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