Seattle Albuquerque Santiago

Why do NJ Transit buses say “Seattle Albuquerque Santiago?”

Why do NJ Transit Buses say Seattle Albuquerque Santiago in HobokenHoboken411 mentioned this in our “Short Hoboken Video Clips” section five months ago, but the problem with NJ Transit buses still persists to this day. Since Hurricane Sandy – the spoken message on the bus PA system, which announces where the bus is going (supposedly for the visually impaired) sends the wrong message. It adds to the end “Seattle Albuquerque Santiago,” which is essentially two western American cities and the capital of Chile! How random is that?

While NJ Transit apparently suffered $400 million in losses as a result of Hurricane Sandy Damage – it seems that much of it was to their rail operations, and the rest was likely lost revenue. No mention of bus issues. Especially this one.

Why their buses communicate this message is very odd – and why such a seemingly simple administrative problem can’t be fixed.

It should be noted that buses throughout the state issue the same message: “Seattle Albuquerque Santiago,” so the problem must affect the entire system. Perhaps NJT is considering moving?

You know why they’ve had this situation for so long without being rectified?

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15 Comments on "Seattle Albuquerque Santiago"

rich k
Member
rich k

And then, of course, there’s this:

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The Professor
Member
The Professor

What the bus is saying is not Spanish and it does sound like “Seattle Albuquerque Santiago.” Maybe they tried to program the Spanish precautionary phrase but it could not be done and auto corrected to this list of places in English. There is no way that is Spanish.

YouStayCl@ssyHoboken
Member
YouStayCl@ssyHoboken

You’re right! If you listen closely, the bus is clearly playing ‘The Sound of San Francisco’ by Global Deejays. NJT must have collaborated on the video, too.[quote comment=”220555″]What the bus is saying is not Spanish and it does sound like “Seattle Albuquerque Santiago.” Maybe they tried to program the Spanish precautionary phrase but it could not be done and auto corrected to this list of places in English. There is no way that is Spanish.[/quote]

joey maxim
Member
joey maxim

sunny you have a point .but the usa when it was a respected power defeated two of the countries you mentioned and france has the best outdoor cafes..the marshall law rebuilt Germany restored japan and south korea and we owe china money..I think china should be on the side of the transit busses..Proberley they own transit as wel..go with the flow.It has become a mad mad mad world.. 😯

sunnybrook
Member
sunnybrook

Why doesn’t this message also repeat in French, German, and Japanese? Do those folks not cross the street or need to be aware of buses turning? Seems discriminatory.

vivaClinton
Member
vivaClinton

If you listen closely it first says “Watch while the bus is turning” and then repeats some version of that in Spanish. It does sound similar to your interpretation. Not sure direct translation because the ones people posted are not what it is saying. I assume they got sued by someone who got hit by a bus turning, so now whenever the driver slightly turns the wheel (including every time it pulls into and out of the stop), it says that. It’s extremely annoying.

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