No dogs at Hoboken City Hall!

Hoboken panders to the minority again with dogs!

Just like we told you earlier in the week – it seems that the minority gets catered to here in Hoboken. If not the false sense of well being fancy bike lanes – it’s this: NO DOGS AT CITY HALL.

Why the hell not? Why just for blind people?

So if the city cites “health reasons” for not allowing dogs – does that make a blind person’s dog completely clean and germ free? I don’t get it! And where are the hooks to tie your dogs outside?

Looks like the most privileged person to be in Hoboken is a blind person riding a bike along with your dog. Probably have some tax-exemptions too.

27 Responses

  1. Exvitermini says:

    I can only hope this post is a joke. Should we lock up the blind in hospitals? You are so right wing it is astounding.

  2. af414 says:

    “Why just for blind people?”

    …umm…..because they are blind?

  3. iamjessg says:

    Since when is this something to complain about? Many facilities/stores/venues don’t allow dogs other than service dogs.

    Someone’s a little bitter.

  4. whineanddineinhob says:

    Seriously Perry—–running out of controversial material? I think you’re stooping to a new low. We could probably get you “first in line” also, if you’re willing to poke your eyes out.

  5. Owen_A_Jase says:

    This is offensive and just plain stupid to post. Do you also have a problem with handicapped people getting big “fancy” stalls in bathrooms too?

  6. Owen_A_Jase says:

    I think the rule makes perfect sense…I think your post is perfectly senseless….

    • hoboken411 says:

      How does it make sense? If it’s OK for blind people, why not for everyone?

      • HomeTeam says:

        Service dogs are screen for temperament and highly trained for a variety of situations. Your average dog has had no such training(no, the doggie course at Petco doesn’t count) and it is just opening up a can of worms for lawsuits for say, dog fights or slip and falls on dog waste. The city would set themselves up for an ADA suit if they denied service dogs entry.[quote comment=”217460″]How does it make sense? If it’s OK for blind people, why not for everyone?[/quote]

      • hoboken411 says:

        Service dog mauls and kills 6 year old..

        newschannel5.com/story/16645526/dog...edical-service-dogs-can-attackquote comment=”217470″]Service dogs are screen for temperament and highly trained for a variety of situations. Your average dog has had no such training(no, the doggie course at Petco doesn’t count) and it is just opening up a can of worms for lawsuits for say, dog fights or slip and falls on dog waste. The city would set themselves up for an ADA suit if they denied service dogs entry.

        [/quote]

  7. HomeTeam says:

    I can see their point as it pertains to liability in case of bites etc. Does the city really need another lawsuit on their hands?

  8. Owen_A_Jase says:

    Are you even listening to yourself? These are service dogs for the blind…of course there should be an exception to the rule.

    • hoboken411 says:

      OK – say this town had 90% blind people with service dogs. The 10% of people with sight couldn’t bring their dogs in? Discrimination!

      If the disability act allows exceptions – why not just toss the whole rule out. Unnecessary administration and red tape. You fail to see the big picture and are the exact “customer” the bloated government loves to have under them.

  9. schwab says:

    Are blind dogs allowed in?

  10. hobokenmac23 says:

    Do you really feel the need to bring your dog to city hall? Blind people actally need to bring there dog everywhere, this makes perfect sense.

    • hoboken411 says:

      Sometimes I’m out with the dog – and want to get a copy of the fireworks brochure they have inside. Not all blind people have service dogs, and why can’t they have a friend or family member help them inside city hall? Who said the dog was mandatory? And what does a blind person need at city hall exactly? Can’t they just call? It’s not like they get parking tickets.

      • xxrjxx says:

        I thought this fell under the Americans With Disabilities Act–you can’t prevent discriminate against the disabled. Preventing service dogs would effectively preclude the disabled from entering into a public place. This is not a matter of cleanliness; beyond this, service dogs are so highly trained that they are far and away less susceptible to having an accident.

        Setting aside the ADA, Perry you really are off base here if you’re comparing the training of your run of the mill household dog to the training service dogs are required to meet.[quote comment=”217467″]Sometimes I’m out with the dog – and want to get a copy of the fireworks brochure they have inside. Not all blind people have service dogs, and why can’t they have a friend or family member help them inside city hall? Who said the dog was mandatory? And what does a blind person need at city hall exactly? Can’t they just call? It’s not like they get parking tickets.[/quote]

      • xxrjxx says:

        Sorry-that should have simply said “you can’t discriminate against the disabled.”[quote comment=”217475″]I thought this fell under the Americans With Disabilities Act–you can’t prevent discriminate against the disabled. Preventing service dogs would effectively preclude the disabled from entering into a public place. This is not a matter of cleanliness; beyond this, service dogs are so highly trained that they are far and away less susceptible to having an accident.Setting aside the ADA, Perry you really are off base here if you’re comparing the training of your run of the mill household dog to the training service dogs are required to meet.[/quote]

  11. af414 says:

    This must be some sort of ploy to drum up interest in National Disability Employment Awareness Month, am I right?

  12. af414 says:

    More service dog horror stories:

    gothamist.com/2011/04/25/9-year-old_brain_cancer_patients_se.php

    http://www.guidehorse.com/news_ot_dogs_kills.htm

    Clearly miniature horses are the solution to this whole mess.

    • xxrjxx says:

      Not that I’m making excuses, however:
      1. The first story references a ‘service dog in training.’
      2. Bad atypical examples make bad law.

      At the end of the day, two facts remain:
      1. you can’t discriminate against the disabled, which is what you’d be doing if you disallowed service animals.
      2. Service animals are trained and typically subjected to significant training, and failing that training will not be accepted as service animals.

      I can assure you-a service dog is not going to leave a dump or take a piss in city hall.[quote comment=”217479″]More service dog horror stories:Clearly miniature horses are the solution to this whole mess.[/quote]

  13. mooshu says:

    I would not bring my dog here. Yuck.

  14. pawzclawz says:

    Perry, You are really being way over the top and quite silly about this issue. I can’t believe you expect anyone to be in your corner on this.

  15. homeworld says:

    Can you believe these entitled disabled people, too? Having their own elitist parking spaces isn’t enough. Now they think they’re entitled to have special ramps installed to get their wheelchairs into buildings and onto sidewalks. Tell them to go back to the Sanitarium to take personal responsibility and care for their lives and get out of the way of us able-bodied productive citizens.

  16. Journey says:

    I would like to suggest everyone remember the last time you needed someone to help you with the following 90% of the time.

    Getting to work, the doctors, school, well anyplace. Had to ask someone to help you cross the street.

    How old were you?

    To be a responsible adult member of society, you have to be self-reliant. I know numerous people with seeing eye dogs and who use canes. So what can a dog do for you that a cane can’t. Well a cane can’t alert you to things like moving people, cars etc. The cane can only let you know what is right there on the ground in front of you.

    I had a friend, when she was in high school the first guide dog school she went to refused to let her have a dog, stating she was too young to have one. This important because the owner of a guide dog must ensure that the training is always reinforced. Her family took her to Ohio to get a dog.

    When I first meet her, she had had the dog for a few years (we were 16) and the dog was only a hazard to her. It was too easily distracted by squirrels and not didn’t do a great job at intersections with watching for cars. The New Jersey commission for the Blind became aware of this during a college prep program we both attended. We both went back to the program the next year, and the NJCB would not let her use her dog and forced her to go back to Ohio for retraining. She and her dog were my college roommates when we were 18-20. I’m glad she had a dog because lazy students liked to drive on the wide sidewalks in the apartment housing section of the campus (too lazy to carry their laundry to the laundry room or their car, then the laundry room.). The dog did a great job of stopping when there was a hazard you could not hear.

    Guide dogs allow a blind person to be independent and self-reliant. If your job could ban guide dogs, you can’t work, and you wind up being supported by taxes. If you barred dogs from city hall, a blind person with a dog could not work there. A blind person with a dog could not go there like a grow up and take care of business. You want them to use a cane instead. I know how to use a cane, with the way people drive in this town, I would want a dog, by the time you hear something this drivers are doing, you are already in danger.

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