Barnabas Health Stops

Barnabas Health Stops – Hoboken, NJ – 59 Washington Street

Man, I’ll tell ya. The whole health industry is a mix between musical chairs and “the shell game,” with the ever-changing names, partnerships and associations. Fascinating and scary at the same time. Anyway, the former “Hoboken Health Stop” (which had already been associated with Liberty Health) has moved from across the PATH to 59 Washington Street – is now called Barnabas Health Stops urgent care center

But instead of only having “after work hours,” they’ve expanded the operation beyond just “urgent care.” They also have various other specialties during normal hours, such as endocrinology, neurology, gynecology and more.

Barnabas Health Stops Hoboken NJ Urgent Care

Description: Multi-specialty health practice and limited “urgent health care” – with limited hours.
Address: 59 Washington Street, Hoboken, NJ 07030
Phone: Urgent Care: (201)876-7903 Specialty Services: (201)792-7929
Online: www.barnabashealthstops.com

Hoboken Health Stop offers medical care 4 hours per weekday

9/13/2012:

This new medical office Hoboken Health Stop that opened up at 2 Hudson Place is an interesting operation.

First of all – it’s run by the Jersey City Medical Center (Liberty Health), which must be a burn to the Hoboken “University” Medical Center since it’s likely they’ll get a LOT of walk-ins that might normally go to Hoboken’s hospital. (Other places like PromptMD on 1st St. might also feel a sting as well, since this new medical office is substantially less expensive only $35 per visit).

Their website is vague, and mentions that they provide basic services like physical exams, treatment for minor injuries and illnesses as well as vaccinations (411 says “no” to vaccinations of all kinds, FYI!)

However – the peculiar aspect of Hoboken Health Stop is their hours of operation: Only 20 hours per week (Monday through Friday, 5pm to 9pm).

Do people only need minor medical care if they’re employed and coming off the PATH train or NJ Transit train after work? I wonder what led to this decision to be open for so few hours during the week… did they have a focus group help them reach this conclusion?

5 Responses

  1. cb95 says:

    The sign in the photo says “After Hours.” 5-9 is a time when most primary care physicians are not available. Being open during this time allows residents who need medical attention to be seen by a doctor without taking off from school/work and without clogging the ER with minor ailments and injuries.

    • Adam_C says:

      That is why everyone gets sick! Because they go to work with their stupid colds and spread it around. [quote comment=”217102″]The sign in the photo says “After Hours.” 5-9 is a time when most primary care physicians are not available. Being open during this time allows residents who need medical attention to be seen by a doctor without taking off from school/work and without clogging the ER with minor ailments and injuries.[/quote]

  2. homeworld says:

    ” (411 says “no” to vaccinations of all kinds, FYI!)”

    What about childhood immunizations?

    • hoboken411 says:

      @homeworld – Yeah, those too. I heard that there’s a link between those and autism, and other stuff. No pills, no shots, no nothing! I haven’t had any of the above in 20+ years.. and hope to keep it that way. The medical industry is worse than organized crime. You know about that whole Statin robbery that’s been going on?

      • Spurs in Jerz says:

        Wow. I must first apologize for the lateness of this reply–I tend to read your site in large bites, catching up on a few days at a time.

        I have read A LOT on this website extolling the health benefits of this, the deadliness of that. I have taken the time to rebut a portion of your pseudoscience and have even agreed to a few things, and just let other items go. I cannot, however, let this one pass.

        For the entire four years or so that I have logged on to H411, I have taken everything with a grain of salt. I enjoy the political back-and-forth, the information about new/closing businesses, and the general ability of the site to keep residents and guests abreast of what is happening in our city. With one little reply, you have set me off.

        I am a physician, and more than that, I am a proud pediatrician. I have spent the last ten years getting to the point in my life that I feel rather certain that anyone who espouses a connection between autism and vaccines to be a charlatan and a fraud. There are MANY studies debunking the 1998 Wakefield Lancet article that gave a mere image of credence to the autism/MMR link. The Lancet has since retracted the article based on ethical violations, including not disclosing he was paid in connection to a pending lawsuit by his patient’s parents, and that he had a rival MMR vaccine in the works for patent. All of these should make one very suspicious of anything stemming from this disastrous, twelve patient (!!!) case study. Especially in light of the millions upon millions of dollars spent worldwide trying to undo the damage done by this one very irresponsible person.

        My reason for venting so is that H411, for all of the conspiracy theories out there, this is the worst for you to cop to. We as a society have been blessed to miss out on the horrors of polio on young children, as well as the deadliness of measles and mumps on an unborn baby. The reason you have not had any vaccines in 20 years is because you got them all already. At this point, you have reaped the benefits of what your pediatrician sowed in giving them to you, and for your parents consenting. And if you didn’t get them all, herd immunity (most of those who are vaccinated around you protect you) kept you sheltered. Consider yourself fortunate.

        If you as a fully consenting adult do not want to get the flu shot this year, or the pneumococcal vaccine in the future, that is fine. You are well within your right to do that, and I will never force the issue. I take umbrage at parents and adults who do not realize that I want little Susy or Johnny to grow up just like them, and to avoid having all those diseases that mom and dad were able to avoid. We are seeing a resurgence of measles in America, as well as pertussis. I have been studying medicine, completing my residency, and working in pediatrics for over ten years now. I had never seen a case of either until last year. I am afraid of going back to the “good ol’ days” of iron lungs, pertussis wards, and the like, just because for the past 14 years there has been so much fruit from Wakefield’s poisonous tree that we cannot convince everyone that vaccines do much, much more good than harm.

        Thirty, forty years ago, we as a society looked to science, technology, and the like as gifts. We were able to extend lifespans by decades in less than a hundred years. We were able to improve longevity, make children not afraid of going outside to play. I am in no way able to recollect those days (I am in my mid thirties), but I do know a slippery slope when I see one. Lack of trust in science and medicine might be one of the most ridiculous things I ever heard of. Consider this, as only an example: take a Somali immigrant, or a refugee from Liberia. Bring them to America and show them the medical advances made in the past 70 years with vaccines. Show them an iron lung and explain how polio can leave you crippled and unable to walk if you’re lucky, but if you are unlucky you spend the rest of your life in a huge metal tube that breathes for you, until you succumb to a pulmonary infection or an infected bedsore. Explain to them that because of extensive efforts, there have only been a few cases of polio in the Americas in the past 40 years. Let them marvel at that for a moment, and then tell them that there is a concerted effort to undo that, to avoid giving vaccines that can prevent diseases as horrible as polio.

        There are side effects to vaccines. I do not dispute that. MMR has shown to lower seizure threshold in sensitive patients. Gardasil, for some reason or another, has the unusual effect of causing dizziness and sometimes fainting spells. TDaP (tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) hurts like hell. Flu shots cause a flu-like illness, but that is NOT the flu. I can without fear say that vaccines have NOT been linked to autism in a causal relationship, after many years of research and many, many, MANY investigations.

        I know that what I write will not sway some people. I know that all the science in the world will not change minds sometimes. Some will look on me as a cog in the medical-industrial complex, which makes me laugh. I wish we had a definite cause of autism, since that would completely end the entire argument once and for all. I hope that in my practice lifetime, I will be able to see a discovery such as this. Regardless, I will always treat children to the best of my ability to make them happy and healthy and able to live a long and fruitful life.

        I do not expect this reply to be posted in it’s entirety, but it would be nice to see it, for the sake of fairness and openness. I just want to express to you, H11, my disappointment in one little flippant line you posted.[quote comment=”217121″]@homeworld – Yeah, those too. I heard that there’s a link between those and autism, and other stuff. No pills, no shots, no nothing! I haven’t had any of the above in 20+ years.. and hope to keep it that way. The medical industry is worse than organized crime. You know about that whole Statin robbery that’s been going on?[/quote]

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