Flooding help?

When do you think construction will actually begin? Now taking bets.

From NJTransit:

NJ TRANSIT COMMITS $10M FOR CONSTRUCTION OF NEW SEWER IN HOBOKEN
Project expected to help mitigate flooding

NEWARK, NJ — NJ TRANSIT today announced that it will commit $10 million toward the construction of a new sewer beneath Observer Highway in Hoboken. The project, which will be undertaken by the North Hudson Sewerage Authority, is expected to help mitigate flooding in the southern section of Hoboken—an area that includes NJ TRANSIT’s Hoboken Terminal and Yard facility.

“I am delighted that NJ TRANSIT is working with the City to alleviate flooding,” said Hoboken Mayor David Roberts. “This project is another example of our continued productive and cooperative partnership with NJ TRANSIT.”

“Modernizing Hoboken’s infrastructure will have benefits for the community, for our operations at Hoboken Terminal, and for the more than 50,000 customers who pass through the Terminal each day,” said NJ TRANSIT Executive Director Richard Sarles. “I want to thank Mayor Dave Roberts for his strong leadership on behalf of the City and for his commitment to making transportation a priority in this community. I would also like to thank Senate Majority Leader Bernard F. Kenny, Jr. for his support in fostering this project.”

In a letter sent to Mayor Roberts today, NJ TRANSIT committed $10 million toward the construction of a new sewer under Observer Highway, the east-west thoroughfare that runs adjacent to NJ TRANSIT’s 65-acre Hoboken Terminal and Yard facility, which is prone to flooding during periods of heavy or sustained precipitation. The funds are subject to NJ TRANSIT Board approval of a memorandum of agreement to be developed with the sewerage authority.

NJ TRANSIT is the nation’s largest statewide public transportation system providing nearly 857,000 weekday trips on 240 bus routes, three light rail lines and 11 commuter rail lines. It is the third largest transit system in the country with 162 rail stations, 60 light rail stations and more than 18,000 bus stops linking major points in New Jersey, New York and Philadelphia.

Hoboken flooding NJ Transit construction

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44 Comments on "Flooding help?"


leigh859
Member
leigh859
9 years 1 month ago

The deal in the Hudson Reporter this week is that the sewerage authority was still in negotiation with NJT when the NJT/Roberts announcement was made and that this was an “unwelcome” development.

You guys can correct me if I’m wrong, but my understanding was that the sewerage authority was a regional agency not under the control of the city of Hoboken.

I’m confused as to where we are. Does this mean that NJT made its pledge to the wrong government agency? If that’s true and the mayor gave things up in return, do we still have to honor those concessions?

I’m getting the feeling NJT is trying to make an end run around a process not working in its favor. I’m all for finding a solution that works, but this development seems to make the situation even more complicated.

moproteus
Member
moproteus
9 years 1 month ago
Regarding the 1984 NY Times article YipYap submitted: For about two years I went to the zoning and planning board meetings when new developments would came up. Being against the continual over-development in Hoboken, I wanted to stop the buildings from going up. Many of the proposed projects were sitting on flood plains and/or contaminated sites. My friends and I would speak and question the engineers and so-called sewer and traffic experts about how they could justify another building. The buildings they were proposing in the areas of Hoboken that were known for flooding on a regular basis really surprised me. I thought, what nut would buy or live there? Well many unsuspecting newcomers who did not do the research of the area would fall prey to these developments by greedy developers. These developers did not live in Hoboken and paid off ‘experts’ to say that there would be no flooding or traffic problems. It was such a farce that was fueled by greed and would harm unsuspecting renters and buyers for those projects. We would leave those meetings disgusted after they passed the project and would shake our heads saying: “BUYER BEWARE!!!!” I remember well the people that are mentioned in the article. They made a lot of money on their projects. It is interesting that the article mentioned the northwestern section. The mayor is talking of taking a chemical plant in that area and turning it into a park. I know I will never step foot on that… Read more »
YipYap
Member
9 years 1 month ago
Here is a 1984 NY times article about the SW section and flooding. Fred Baldo knew of these issues way back then but still nothing was done. November 11, 1984 A NEW HOBOKEN REVIVAL AREA By ANTHONY DEPALMA MOST of the brownstones where Hoboken’s revival began have been claimed and the area around the city’s PATH station has already been substantially rehabilitated. But that has not slowed the pace of change. The prime target today is the southwest section, the closest to the cliffs of the Palisades. There, abandoned factories are being converted to condominium and co-op apartments, old bank buildings and stores are being restored and – most surprising to many who had written off the area – new buildings are going up on many blocks. ”The southwest quadrant had been given up as a no-man’s land,” said Robert A. Ranieri, a Hoboken Councilman. ”Now on just one block of First Street, we’ve got eight new houses going up. We haven’t had eight new buildlings there over the last 100 years.” The section is roughly bounded by Willow Avenue on the east, Observer Highway on the Jersey City border to the south, Seventh Street on the north and the Palisades on the west. Projects are scattered throughout the area, but the largest concentration is along First Street, once a bustling shopping district and just a 15-minute walk to the PATH station. Fred M. Bado, director of Hoboken’s Community Development Agency, said there were a number of reasons the area… Read more »
Margaret
Member
9 years 1 month ago
Stop ALL the building until the flooding issues are addressed and rectified in the worst parts of town. Willow Avenue was a swamp for many years, and Hoboken is slanted yet as a result. Downtown building knew about the low sea level BEFORE ANYTHING WENT UP AND WAS BUILT THERE. THE CITY HAS TEN MILLION TO START..THE PROJECT TO STOP THE FLOODING IS THIRTY MILLION. WHY CAN’T THEY TAKE THE TEN AND START IN THE WORST SECTIONS. IF JERSEY CITY and BROOKLYN CAN GET FUNDING FOR EMERGENCY (WHICH THEY DID RECENTLY) WHERE IS OURS? a PENNY TAX FOR THE TAX PAYERS TO VOTE ON HAS TO HAVE A GARGOYLE OR TWO SITTING ON WHAT IS COLLECTED OR IT MIGHT JUST EVAPORATE INTO SOMETHING ELSE. this city HAS A HISTORY OF ADRESSING A PROBLEM, GETTING THE FUNDS, AND THEN THOSE SAME FUNDS EVAPORATE OR GET INCORPORATED INTO SOMETHING ELSE! we need FOLLOW UP ON ALL MONIES COMING IN OR GOING OUT…A “SWINGING DOOR ORDINANCE” to double check on $ or the flooding $ might just be diverted to something else. several disaster relief funds CAN BE APPLIED FOR BY THOSE IN CHARGE. WE HAVE NOT HEARD OF ANYTHING CONCERNING THIS..THERE ARE ENOUGH PICTURES AND COMPLAINTS TO JUSTIFY DISASTER HERE…… Been working with the SEWAGE AUTHORITY HERE TO KEEP MY OWN FEET DRY AND HAVE PICTURES LETTERS AND FULL DOCUMENTATION CONCERNING THE RESIDENTS HERE ON MY BLOCK AND AREA….THEY HAVE BEEN MOST COOPERATIVE AND OUR BASEMENT AND SEWER PROBLEMS HAVE BEEN ADDRESSED… Read more »
LynnZe
Member
LynnZe
9 years 1 month ago

It was probably his campaign headquarters. It’s still all decked out in gay posters because he can’t admit that he lost and he’s a big loser. Ironically it probably flooded and now stinks like a cespool.

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