Low Carb Tips: What to avoid

Things to watch out for when low carb living

Low carb living is fairly straightforward for the most part. Keep your blood sugar low by avoiding sugars, breads, starches – and enjoy a high-protein, high-fat diet.

Once you’ve settled into your low carb world – you begin spotting little speed bumps that you want to avoid to keep your body in ketosis as much as possible.

Here are a few tips that you can add to your low-carb files:

Avoid MSG at all costs

This means you need to read the labels of even so-called healthy foods. In addition to causing obesity, it’s also been linked to diabetes, headaches, and Alzheimer’s.

Called the “nicotine of food,” you’ll notice that you actually shovel the food almost like you’re obsessed.

For instance, I discovered that a once-favorite peanut brand I liked (Emerald Dry Roasted) contained MSG, and it became clear why I mindlessly popped them one after another. I switch to a better brand of peanuts (from The Peanut Shop of Williamsburg – delicious!) Note that while semi-low carb, peanuts in general should be eaten in very small amounts.

So read your labels, because MSG can also be called by other names, those tricky bastards!

Say NO to artificial sweeteners!

Tricking your body into thinking it’s getting calories is not a good idea. Diet soda, Nutrasweet, and the like actually promote weight gain and obesity.

See the study done by Yale University a couple years ago.

Yeah, it kinda sucks that our bodies crave sweet things, but over time you easily adapt to living without. I now enjoy coffee without any added sweetener. No sweat.

Skip the skim milk!

Just because skim milk is low in fat, doesn’t mean it’s any healthier. They process skim milk so much, and as a result it contains a lot of sugar (carbs). Plus you need to use a LOT more of it to get the “creaming effect” you’re looking for in your coffee.

Best alternative? Yep, HEAVY CREAM. A cup of skim milk has 12g of carbs, while heavy cream has ZERO. If heavy cream is not available, half & half is still better than skim (about 33% less carbs, and you’ll use much less).

Enjoy your low carb living!

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19 Comments on "Low Carb Tips: What to avoid"


Member
Journey
3 years 7 months ago

There are some yogurts that have less sugar. I like siggi’s even the sweetened varieties (agave nectar) has 14 grams of protein, 11 grams of Carbohydrates (9 from sugar), and it is fat free.

Member
Journey
3 years 7 months ago

I have been maintaining a moderate calorie deficient, and losing about a pound a week. I got derailed when I got sick and was put on some medications that have steroids in them, muscle mass increased, but blood sugar was through the roof (nasty side effect) and I was in no condition to get extra exercise in.

Slow and steady wins the race.

Member
LeslieGoldstein
3 years 7 months ago

Low carb diets will help you to lose weight. But so will low fat or avoiding bread. When you leave foods out of your diet you are bound to lose weight. You may not, however, be getting proper nutrients, vitamins and minerals that your body needs. For example, by avoiding carbs you are not providing your body with needed energy that your brain needs to function- so eventually, after you have lost some weight you may start to feel weak or tired and you may crave some of the carbs you have avoided resulting in binge eating.

Carbs are not all bad- the group also includes fruit, fruit juices, yogurt, milk and whole grains. By focusing on the good carbs- as above and additionally brown rice, whole wheat bread, legumes (beans, lentils) and low fat dairy you will get good nutrients from carbs. Avoiding the “bad” carbs such as refined/white bread, cakes, cookies and heavily processed foods is a better idea.

Carbs should actually make up approximately half of your daily intake.
But, if you are eating too much of something such as bread- it doesn’t hurt to cut it out temporarily until you can gain control of your portions/cravings.

Leslie Goldstein, RD

Member
3 years 7 months ago

Really not the best advice. Fruit juices and most yogurts contain a ton of sugar. Even on a so called balanced diet these should be avoided. I get carbs in my vegetables. In fact I probably eat more veggies than I ever have. I eat a ton of spinach, cauliflower, broccoli, asparagus, peppers. I get plenty of nutrients.

Saying that by not eating bread, sugar and whole pasta will cause you to be weak and cause your brain not to function is plain BS. Honestly, do some more research on the subject. Read TNT from Men’s Health, read the book 411 recommended Wheat Belly. Because you have been preaching your advice for lord knows how long does not make it correct. I know at least 10 people that have gone to a low carb lifestyle over the last 3 years and they have never had as much energy, been stronger, able to work more hours because they aren’t having crazy blood sugar spikes. And yes, they all have maintained the lifestyle and are very happy. Why wouldn’t they be since they all feel 100 times better.Meanwhile, any of my friends that have tried weight watchers and your standard low ft approach all have fallen off the wagon and gained their weight back.

Losing fat is not as easy as calories in calories out. I know that’s what a lot of nutritionist want you to believe but it’s been disproven many times. There have been many studies where people ate the same number of calories, some with mostly carbs, others with mostly fat, and others with mostly protein. The group with mostly carbs consistently loses less fat than the other groups. Not to mention they lost more muscle than the other groups as well.

[quote comment=”213355″]Low carb diets will help you to lose weight. But so will low fat or avoiding bread. When you leave foods out of your diet you are bound to lose weight. You may not, however, be getting proper nutrients, vitamins and minerals that your body needs. For example, by avoiding carbs you are not providing your body with needed energy that your brain needs to function- so eventually, after you have lost some weight you may start to feel weak or tired and you may crave some of the carbs you have avoided resulting in binge eating.Carbs are not all bad- the group also includes fruit, fruit juices, yogurt, milk and whole grains. By focusing on the good carbs- as above and additionally brown rice, whole wheat bread, legumes (beans, lentils) and low fat dairy you will get good nutrients from carbs. Avoiding the “bad” carbs such as refined/white bread, cakes, cookies and heavily processed foods is a better idea.Carbs should actually make up approximately half of your daily intake. But, if you are eating too much of something such as bread- it doesn’t hurt to cut it out temporarily until you can gain control of your portions/cravings.Leslie Goldstein, RD[/quote]

Member
3 years 7 months ago

Low Carb isn’t exactly a healthy choice either, for many they become tired after being on it, start eating carbs again, and then the yo-yo diet fad continues. You are much better off to just eat a well balanced diet and have a decent amount of activity in your life. This often means eating what you want and still being and looking healthy.

I am 225lbs, have a six pack, and eat basically whatever i want (though primarily lots of chicken, steak, lean meat, eggs, LOTS of (whole wheat) pasta, and go through a gal of milk about every two days. You can watch your weight without any ‘fad’ diets if you are willing to put the time into it.

Member
ILoveHoboken
3 years 7 months ago

Very well said, fmtveng. So many people are looking for that magic diet to lose weight, and it is simply calories in vs calories out. The problem is many people don’t want to do the work to lose weight. So many of my friends are on starvation diets but gain back the weight and then some. It’s just not healthy IMO.[quote comment=”213350″]Low Carb isn’t exactly a healthy choice either, for many they become tired after being on it, start eating carbs again, and then the yo-yo diet fad continues. You are much better off to just eat a well balanced diet and have a decent amount of activity in your life. This often means eating what you want and still being and looking healthy.I am 225lbs, have a six pack, and eat basically whatever i want (though primarily lots of chicken, steak, lean meat, eggs, LOTS of (whole wheat) pasta, and go through a gal of milk about every two days. You can watch your weight without any ‘fad’ diets if you are willing to put the time into it.[/quote]

Member
greghoboken
3 years 7 months ago

The skim milk/ heavy cream advice in this article is horrbile.

The following are the nutrition facts for milk and heavy cream.

1 Cup of skim milk: 86 cals, 0 fat, 12 g carbs, 5mg chlosterol
1 tablespoon of heavy cream: 52 cals, 5.5g fat (3.5 g saturated fat), 0 carbs, 21 mg chlosterol

I understand that carbs are bad, but to suggest trading some carbs for saturated fat and chlosterol seems crazy. Additionally, when you realize that people probably arent putting a full cup of milk in their coffee and would probably use more than a tablespoon of cream in their coffee, the supposed “benefit” (which actually doesn’t exist) gets even worse.

Last point here, the tip doesn’t mention anything about uses other than coffee. Does the author also suggest filling our cereal bowls with heavy cream too…probably not. Skim milk is probably the best choice for dairy if you are going to be using it.

Member
iforgotmymantra
3 years 7 months ago

I often eat my cereal with half and half instead of the skim milk that my office has around. You have no idea how good this is ’til you do it. Maybe the author would not suggest it, but I would. Do you not eat ice cream ever?[quote comment=”213347″]The skim milk/ heavy cream advice in this article is horrbile.The following are the nutrition facts for milk and heavy cream.1 Cup of skim milk: 86 cals, 0 fat, 12 g carbs, 5mg chlosterol 1 tablespoon of heavy cream: 52 cals, 5.5g fat (3.5 g saturated fat), 0 carbs, 21 mg chlosterolI understand that carbs are bad, but to suggest trading some carbs for saturated fat and chlosterol seems crazy. Additionally, when you realize that people probably arent putting a full cup of milk in their coffee and would probably use more than a tablespoon of cream in their coffee, the supposed “benefit” (which actually doesn’t exist) gets even worse.Last point here, the tip doesn’t mention anything about uses other than coffee. Does the author also suggest filling our cereal bowls with heavy cream too…probably not. Skim milk is probably the best choice for dairy if you are going to be using it.[/quote]

Member
3 years 7 months ago

It’s so amazing how misinformed the American public has become about fat in general. The first thing people need to get though their head is that just eating fat does not make you fat. Once you get over the fear of fat it will be easier for you to realize why this lifestyle is more healthy than a lifestyle of high carbs and low fat. Obviously if people living the low barb lifestyle they wouldn’t be eating cereal, so that wouldn’t happen. Also, i bet you will find many people that can drink a whole carton of skim milk, but no one could do that with heavy cream even if they wanted to. You’d be amazed on how your body stops you from eating too many calories once you cut out the carbs. Carbs like those found in skim mil wreak havoc on your blood sugar and insulin levels, and make you feel hungry almost all the time, even after eating a lot of calories.

A good book written by the folks at Men’s Health magazine is called the TNT Diet. I would recommend reading it as it give a lot of good advice, and the science behind the low carb. It’s also from Men’s Health, not some fringe low carb guy that no one has ever heard of.

On another note, just finished my dinner of homemade cauliflower soup and sausage & Peppers. Quite good![quote comment=”213347″]The skim milk/ heavy cream advice in this article is horrbile.The following are the nutrition facts for milk and heavy cream.1 Cup of skim milk: 86 cals, 0 fat, 12 g carbs, 5mg chlosterol 1 tablespoon of heavy cream: 52 cals, 5.5g fat (3.5 g saturated fat), 0 carbs, 21 mg chlosterolI understand that carbs are bad, but to suggest trading some carbs for saturated fat and chlosterol seems crazy. Additionally, when you realize that people probably arent putting a full cup of milk in their coffee and would probably use more than a tablespoon of cream in their coffee, the supposed “benefit” (which actually doesn’t exist) gets even worse.Last point here, the tip doesn’t mention anything about uses other than coffee. Does the author also suggest filling our cereal bowls with heavy cream too…probably not. Skim milk is probably the best choice for dairy if you are going to be using it.[/quote]