Living the low-carb life!

Low carb and healthy living feature on Hoboken411

Now that we’ve made it to 2012, it’s time to introduce a new feature category here on Hoboken411 called Low Carb Living.”

Back in the 4th quarter of 2011, I made a dramatic and positive change in my life – and the purpose of this new feature is to share the profound benefits of what I’ve learned – and how anyone can do it in Hoboken.

We will dispel myths, offer tips, debate the science and provide local guidance to help spread the word about how important it is for everyone to join the low-carb lifestyle – even those who may appear thin and physically fit. That’s right, you shouldn’t reduce your carbohydrate consumption purely for superficial reasons. Living a long, healthy life practically depends on it!

For most people, making the switch to this low carb way of life is a bit of a shocker, and can often be hard to sustain. It’s not a easy as it sounds on paper, but can be made simple once you’re armed with the proper resources needed to make the change permanent.

So be on the lookout for fun & exciting updates over the next 12 months – videos, reviews, recipes and local Hoboken tips that will help you succeed big time!

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16 Comments on "Living the low-carb life!"

Journey
Member
Journey

I buy frozen unsweetened cranberries, they are very low carb and if you like tart pack a lot of flavor into something.

wiskeytango1
Member
wiskeytango1

journey..There is no such thing as a boarderline diabetic for those who believe so. Any emdocrinolgolist will tell a diabetic that 45 carbs at breakfast lunch and supper is the norm..beer builds up glucose,but bread is the #1 killer..more than a piece of cake.Stress is a factor too. numbers in the am should be btn 90 and 110..You spike after breakfast and the numbers will decrease by lunchtime…and of course the meds must be taken at the proper time. Insuln users have some idea that they can eat more than their allowed,and that’s added weight.harmfull to the kidneys and b/p..I was told never to take a glucose med prior to bedtime without some type of snack..
Ones sugar can drop to a dangerous level while asleep..and feel hungry..shakey etc
Diabetis can also be hereditary ,but contrae to what some think the dr said there is no boarderline diabetic and can get worse as time goes on.If one reads all the books and quick cure ads they are just money makers for the consumer.. 🙁

Journey
Member
Journey
By the current standards, (which many people feel diagnoses people too late and after they are already suffering complications), I’m not diabetic. My Glucose Tolerance tests are in the normal range, my HA1C is below 6. My fasting blood glucose is bit high. But I had Gestational, I have relatives with type 2. So my doctor is being proactive and said type 2. A doctor strictly following the current guildline would wait till my condition worsened. My treatment plan is eating well and exercising, no meds. That is why I used the phrase borderline. I can eat a healthy meal and only have BG of 90. In the past year my highest BG was 148 and my average is 110. Diabetes complications claimed the life of my cousin. I have no intention of letting my health deteriorate.[quote comment=”213657″]journey..There is no such thing as a boarderline diabetic for those who believe so. Any emdocrinolgolist will tell a diabetic that 45 carbs at breakfast lunch and supper is the norm..beer builds up glucose,but bread is the #1 killer..more than a piece of cake.Stress is a factor too. numbers in the am should be btn 90 and 110..You spike after breakfast and the numbers will decrease by lunchtime…and of course the meds must be taken at the proper time. Insuln users have some idea that they can eat more than their allowed,and that’s added weight.harmfull to the kidneys and b/p..I was told never to take a glucose med prior to bedtime without some… Read more »
Journey
Member
Journey

“Blood Sugar 101: What they don’t tell you about Diabetes” by Jenny Ruhl, has some interesting info on how blood sugar is handled.

Journey
Member
Journey

http://www.bloodsugar101.com/%5Bquote comment=”213641″]“Blood Sugar 101: What they don’t tell you about Diabetes” by Jenny Ruhl, has some interesting info on how blood sugar is handled.[/quote]

Journey
Member
Journey

There is more to obesity today than the change to low fat. Portion sizes have exploded. More meals are from restaurants (fast food) than from home. I’m sure we can all think of at least 3 things that have changed about the American eating habits over the past few decades.

I’m losing weight, gaining muscle, and controlling type 2 diabetes, with only how I eat and what I do. I can eat a nice hearty breakfast and have a blood sugar below 100.

I don’t think I would be diagnosed as diabetic any longer, they would call it pre-diabetes, as I have excellent glucose tolerance, but impaired fasting glucose tolerance.

I did a lot of this working with nutritionist. My diet is balanced, it has fat, protein and carbs in moderation. I eat what I like in moderation. I currently track what I eat, because it is educational to see what foods do what to my blood sugar, my sense of fullness, and well being.

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