Reader Mail: Intervention?

And no, not like that A&E show Intervention.

We’re talking about if you witness an assault or domestic violence incident, what would you do? I know it should be human nature to help each other out, but in some instances it could be very hazardous, especially with crazed lunatics who may be armed and injure more people. I can understand stepping in for a loved one, but often times when it’s complete strangers, people can often feel powerless. It’s not that often something brutal happens in your presence, and it’s hard to be prepared.

This 411 reader writes in:

“Today I witnessed a boyfriend in his mid-20’s violently beating his girlfriend. It was crowded on the street and no one stepped in, including myself (that guy would have killed us both). I didn’t have my cell, but if I did I was would have called 911. The cops finally got there (I am guessing a neighbor called 911), and the girl escaped. But in an after thought, I was thinking, what if I yelled to him to stop it and he pulled a gun ( I know big imagination), but what if? Then it got me thinking how many others out there would step in when seeing something this? What do you think, do you think people would get involved? I feel terrible I couldn’t do anything to help that girl.”

Would you volunteer yourself to participate in an unpredictable situation like that?

[rockyou 69389460]

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16 Comments on "Reader Mail: Intervention?"


chicagofinance
Member
chicagofinance
9 years 3 months ago

[quote comment=”28250″]Her name was Kitty Genovese. It’s not necessarily common for people to sit on the sidelines, but it does have a classification: ‘the bystander effect’

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect%5B/quote%5D

The ‘the bystander effect’ is closely related to ‘the campos effect’ which is essentially the same, except the person shouts a lot, talks over other people and out of turn, almost doubles his weight in six years, and otherwise accomplishes nothing. Oh yeah, also – when the cops show up, he flashes his Hoboken Council President badge.

emarche
Member
9 years 3 months ago

Her name was Kitty Genovese. It’s not necessarily common for people to sit on the sidelines, but it does have a classification: ‘the bystander effect’

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect

shoegirl
Member
shoegirl
9 years 3 months ago

It’s common for people to ignore thses types of situations. There was a woman in NYC, I believe her name was Kitty Davidson. She was brutally murdered in the middle of the afternoon in front of her apt builiding. It was many years ago. All of her neighbors reported hearing her screams for help yet, no one did anything or called the police. You may have also heard on the news the 90 year old man who was carjacked either last week or the week before. The tapes from the convience store or gas station that incident occured at showed people on the other side of the car just watching. These people had nothing to do with the car jacking they were just bystanders.

I don’t know why people stay away from these situations maybe we are just scared. It may not be the right reaction but, I think its our natural instinct to hide from danger. Most of us have to will ourselves to jump in and get involved with a strangers life. I’m not making excuses or saying it’s the right reaction. it’s just the normal reaction for most people.

DietCokeGal
Member
DietCokeGal
9 years 3 months ago

The only time I will get involved because I cannot keep my mouth shut and cannot help myself is when kids are involved. If I spot a parent or caregiver mistreating a child I will become slightly possessed.
Other than that as a 4’11” woman who usually has one of the hated double strollers and two kids with her there isn’t much I’m gonna toss myself in the way of.

zxcv
Member
zxcv
9 years 4 months ago

As I’ve said on here before, if you call 911 from a cell phone, it gets routed to the Hudson County 911 central call center in Jersey City. The operator then has to figure out what the emergency is and what town you’re located in, then route the call to the correct police department.

The best thing to do is call 420-2100, which is the direct line to the Hoboken police department.

It is substantially quicker than 911.

For example, if you call 911 and say you’re at the corner of 14th & Washington or 2nd & Hudson and get disconnected, there no way for them to tell if you’re in Hoboken or at the same named corner in Jersey City (those corners exist in JC as well).

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