Feral Cats abound

Hoboken isn’t alone with Feral Cats!

Hoboken411 doesn’t really have a position on these Feral Cats that pepper our neighborhoods. It is what it is. Some folks make it their life-long mission, while others feel they’re bad for our environment. I’m not playing that game…

But on a recent waterfront walk which took me miles up the Hudson to Edgewater, NJ – I spotted this whole crew of wild cats living under a strip mall on River Road. Some cats were completely un-fluttered by people walking by.

Which made me wonder. Does anyone know why they have those “Trap, Neuter, Return” programs – and not “Trap, Neuter and ADOPT?” Why do they throw them back in the wild? These kitties seem like they’d make great house guests. Why not?

Uptown Hoboken is Feral Cat infested

As you might know – the construction area uptown is home to many feral cats.

Happened to be walking the pooch there the other day when that lady feeds those felines as well. The cats come out to greet the woman – and some kitties were pretty much unfazed that Hoboken411 Mascot Oscar was going berserk.

In case you’re interested in helping these homeless pussycats – the next Neighborhood Feral Cat Workshop is on July 9th.

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15 Comments on "Feral Cats abound"


Member
Snip119
4 years 6 days ago

It’s a very sad situation with the feral cats. If the kittens can be captured at a young age, they are adoptable and make loving house pets. If the cat has been on the street for a while, however, they are not socialized and will in some cases never be litter trained, making it difficult to get them adopted. If they can be trapped and neutered/spayed, at least their numbers won’t continue to grow.

Member
elainetyger
4 years 6 days ago

My friend and I trapped and neutered 4 cow-pattern cats behind the condo complex on 8th & Park: Molly and her 3 kittens. Molly’s parents previously died back there after living there for many years. Right after Molly’s dad died, she had his kitten (that’s why I call her Molly, like Moll Flanders) and I just grabbed the newborn kitten and took it to the vet on Washington to have it euthanized in case it was a tom, but they found it a home including a woman who fed it hourly with a bottle. Then when there was a gut-rehab on 8th, a tom got into the yards and Molly had 3 more and that’s when we trapped and neutered them. One of the kittens was accepted for fostering and adoption but the other cats were all too feral. A second kitten escaped to the street, got hit by a car and broke her leg, which calmed her down enough to get her adopted. Molly and her daughter Phantom (for her facial markings) still live in the yards between Garden/9th/Park/8th. Their ears are clipped Some of the people in the Park buildings feed them.

Member
Journey
4 years 6 days ago
Member
Journey
4 years 6 days ago

TNR is designed to slow the the population growth of feral cats. It is not designed to reduce the number of cats out there, just prevent you from adding more.

Some feral cats are not adoptable. Who would take in cats CapnJon described? if you brought all the stray cats into the shelter system, the shelter system would be over burdened. Most shelters in NJ are kill shelters anyway so they are not required to keep the animals more than 7 days (to give owners to reclaim lost pets).

The cats I adopted were found by a rescue organization in one of NJ’s many kill shelters, raised in foster care until I adopted them. My girls are indoor only cats. It was part of my adoption contract, as was getting them fixed, one of the many reasons I greatly respect the rescue organization.

Member
Stella
4 years 6 days ago

Unfortunately many of these feral cats do not make great pets. Some of the kittens can adapt but not the older ones. So a maintained colony is the best option.