Hoboken Police and Fire Blotter: 4/12/2011

Hoboken crime and fire action: April 12, 2011

An ongoing list of various noteworthy incidents, crimes and fire-calls throughout the day for Tuesday, April 12, 2011. This post may be updated and “bumped” periodically.

  • 1:45pm: Apartment invasion and assault
    At 1233 Park Avenue, on the 5th Floor – a black male (5’1″, heavy set, wearing all black) forcibly entered a woman’s apartment, with the apparent intent to burglarize – but assaulted her after he realized she was home. He fled on a black bicycle and headed westbound. Police are canvassing the area and EMS is on scene treating the woman.

More updates to come…

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7 Comments on "Hoboken Police and Fire Blotter: 4/12/2011"

mooshu
Member
mooshu
With all due respect for your training, and for a number of police officers everywhere, I understand Stabone’s questions. What can you do but theorize a little when your evidence is severely limited to a disguised, fat black male who stands at 5’1? There are lots of short, chubby, dark-skinned males walking around… I grew up in an area where lots of robberies took place. Our family’s lock had actually suffered a few bruises from attempted break-ins, even though we owned nothing fancy. To think that our building manager (super) wanted that lock removed because it locked from both sides and was a “hazard” to us in the event of a fire. He claimed he didn’t have a copy of that key all the time. It was because we didn’t want him to have one. He was a thief after all. We just kept telling him “we have to make a copy for you… soon”, and the moron consistently fell for it because he was too doped up or drunk (or both) to reason. Ahh. We didn’t part with that lock. It was so reliable we never needed to turn the key from the inside… or move for that matter. We couldn’t afford to move. Anyway, I have literally seen small holes that were formed in vacant apartments that lead a thief into rented spaces with nice stuff in them. The nice stuff disappeared, obviously, and the holes were perfectly-shaped for our elf-size, doped-up building manager/super, the O N L… Read more »
NoHorse
Member
NoHorse
Mooshu, your story is certainly tragic, saddening, frustrating, and enlightening. And believe it or not it is also a story that many Police Officers can relate to on many levels. Many grew up in the same conditions, which leads me to the point I made last, shedding some light on the Law Enforcement Community. While your story most certainly happened just how you remember it, if I read it correctly, it sounds like you remember it as though the Police were either uncaring, unwilling, or worse complicit to the events when you made the statement…. “Ever so surprisingly, however, he was never really questioned by police or made responsible for any wrongdoing. They believed our super when he said that the hole in that vacant apartment was a construction project….”. I will not suggest, or be so naive to say that there has never been or never will be a “Dirty” Cop or Cops. Nor will I say that this event you speak of is not one in which “Dirty” Cops were involved. I would have no way of knowing. What I do know however is that those Officers are in the extreme minority within the Law Enforcement Community. How do I know that many Officers have stories such as yours to tell? How can I state that the Overwhelming Majority of Officers are NOT “Dirty”? I know this because of what most people who become somewhat untrusting of the Police seem to forget, WE ARE YOU. We are not… Read more »
mooshu
Member
mooshu

If 1233 is the building I’m thinking of, it’s pretty populated and managed by Applied maybe (?). A robber *could* weave in and out of the fifth floor undetected if he’s a good actor.

In any case, I think it’s a friend of someone in that building who knows what this tenant has in her apartment. Why target that specific apartment, which is all the way upstairs, otherwise? This is just a thought, and I also don’t believe that maturity or professionalism is playing a part in this robbery turned assault.

Stabone130
Member

kinda curious that a heavy set burglar would invade an apartment on the 5th floor at 2pm in the afternoon…..wonder if he picked this particular apartment for a reason. Why not go for the 1st or 2nd floor for an easy getaway?

NoHorse
Member
NoHorse

This is the problem with people who are not in Law Enforcement thinking that they can just put together a theory without any training and/or Police Background. No disrespect intended to Stabone. However it is more common for the more “mature burglars” to target higher, if not the top, floors. Reason being, less people travel to the top floor whereas everyone passes thru the first floor as they enter a particular building. Of course there are many factors in play however this is just a little something to think about when you begin assuming, or should I say questioning, certain actions. [quote comment=”205775″]kinda curious that a heavy set burglar would invade an apartment on the 5th floor at 2pm in the afternoon…..wonder if he picked this particular apartment for a reason. Why not go for the 1st or 2nd floor for an easy getaway?[/quote]

Entitlem1nt
Member
Entitlem1nt

Saying that mature burglers target upper-floor apartments is plain silly (no disrespect intended). Burglers target places where they can enter and leave quickly. The longer a thief is ‘on the scene’, the higher the chance that he/she will get caught. Having to pass through 5 floors of residents is a gauntlet the very few would risk. Perhaps you should go for further training and learn that most criminal activity is opportunistic and spontaneous.[quote comment=”205792″]This is the problem with people who are not in Law Enforcement thinking that they can just put together a theory without any training and/or Police Background. No disrespect intended to Stabone. However it is more common for the more “mature burglars” to target higher, if not the top, floors. Reason being, less people travel to the top floor whereas everyone passes thru the first floor as they enter a particular building. Of course there are many factors in play however this is just a little something to think about when you begin assuming, or should I say questioning, certain actions.

[/quote]

NoHorse
Member
NoHorse
Unlike many of those who post here (as well as many other sites), I actually have extensive training. Training I have actually used to solve more burglaries, robberies, frauds, thefts, etc… than I care to remember. Training I’ve attained over many years of Police Work. However, I didn’t decide to post on this, or any other site, to pick fights with others. Honestly, it is my hope that I might slowly begin to shed just a little bit of light on the honest, hardworking, caring and yes knowledgeable Officers that work for the Hoboken Police Department. So much pride, effort, and determination go into the work these Officers do everyday but it is rarely mentioned and almost always twisted into some type of negativity. I would never post details, confidential facts, nor any other piece of information that would jeopardize a case nor cause someone or something potential harm. However, I would love to slowly, once again slowly, help to clear up some misconceptions with regard to how things really work on a law enforcement level. Thanks for your patience![quote comment=”205802″]Saying that mature burglers target upper-floor apartments is plain silly (no disrespect intended). Burglers target places where they can enter and leave quickly. The longer a thief is ‘on the scene’, the higher the chance that he/she will get caught. Having to pass through 5 floors of residents is a gauntlet the very few would risk. Perhaps you should go for further training and learn that most criminal activity is… Read more »
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