Hoboken Water – Do you distill?

3/17/2011:

Scary to think about what’s in Hoboken water!

Hoboken resident Elizabeth cares very much about what she puts in her body. She distills her water – and sent the following picture:

She said that just distilling one gallon of Hoboken tap water, typically results in a 1/4 cup of sediment and particles (around 2 dry ounces!)

Why Distill your water?

“We typically have the same white grey powder stuff in Hoboken but it has been colored, the dark looking matter becomes more disgusting whenever there are water breaks (dirt, sewage get in the line during water breaks) which is why you may notice a stronger chlorine smell.

We have not had it officially tested. Sometimes it is black – sometimes it is brown, sometimes it is orange.

I use distilled water because it helps remove toxins form your system and it get most of the contaminants out of the water. Did you know we have 250 pharmaceuticals in our water supply?

Distilled water is the purest water. Distillation produces the best quality water for transporting nutrients and for eliminating wastes from the body.”

Take a look at this United Water Report…

The Problem with the water supply

Chronic toxicity is very difficult to assess, especially when more than one contaminant is involved. The fact is, the volume of research needed to assess drinking water risks has just not been done, because no one knows where to start.

Risk assessment is a complex process. Risks involved in bottled or tap-water consumption may never be fully assessable, largely due to the overwhelming numbers of toxins that are now seeping into water supplies. And EPA has established “safe levels” for many toxins without analyzing the cumulative risk. Only in acute outbreaks of poisoning do the dangers of drinking bad water come to light, for a time.

What impurities are not removed?

Distillers can allow 0.3 to 0.5 percent of water impurities to exist in the storage container after distilling.

Some volatile organic contaminants (VOCs), certain pesticides and volatile solvents, boil at temperatures very close to water (207-218 degrees Fahrenheit). These types of contaminants will not be substantially reduced in concentration by distillation. Properly equipped distillers can reduce VOC concentrations effectively.

Although bacteria are removed by distillation, they may recolonize on the cooling coils during inactive periods.

Now, purified water and filtered water are pretty much two phrases meaning the same thing. Water can be purified by Distillation, by boiling or by reverse Osmosis filtration. Filtered water means it was run through a filter. Which kind? Who knows? Depends.

Most tap water is highly filtered and often reverse osmosis purified. About 80% of bottled water is straight tap water.

You can also read more about Pharmaceuticals lurking in U.S. drinking water by searching the web. The University of Arizona also has a piece on that.

Do you worry about what’s in the water you drink?

Leave a Reply

5 Comments on "Hoboken Water – Do you distill?"

homeworld
Member

There’s both sides to the coin:

The drinking of distilled water has been both advocated and discouraged for health reasons. The lack of naturally occurring minerals in distilled water has raised some concerns. The Journal of General Internal Medicine[11] published a study on the mineral contents of different waters available in the US. The study concluded
Drinking water sources available to North Americans may contain high levels of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ and may provide clinically important portions of the recommended dietary intake of these minerals. Physicians should encourage patients to check the mineral content of their drinking water, whether tap or bottled, and choose water most appropriate for their needs.

It is often observed that consumption of “hard” water, or water that has some minerals, is associated with beneficial cardiovascular effects. As noted in the American Journal of Epidemiology, consumption of hard drinking water is negatively correlated with atherosclerotic heart disease.[12] Since distilled water is free of minerals, it will not have these potential benefits.

While a growing number of people prefer fluoride-free water for health reasons, others still suggest that—because distilled water lacks fluoride ions that are added by many governments (e.g. municipalities in the United States) at water treatment plants using fluoridation for its inhibition of cavity formation—the drinking of distilled water may increase the risk of tooth decay due to a lack of this element.[13] Of course fluoride can still be applied to the teeth alone with toothpaste and fluoride therapy.[14]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distilled_water

The Professor
Member
The Professor

That really is an incredible amount of sediment. I don’t distill but do worry about the pharmaceuticals in the water much more than anything else. I sued to filter, but it hardly seemed effective enough.

@Elizabeth: could you explain what you do to distill your water? I’ve heard in the past that it involves a lot of labor so I was quickly turned off to the idea- is there an easy way?

homeworld
Member

It’s as simple as buying one of these: Countertop Water Distiller[quote comment=”204594″]That really is an incredible amount of sediment. I don’t distill but do worry about the pharmaceuticals in the water much more than anything else. I sued to filter, but it hardly seemed effective enough. @Elizabeth: could you explain what you do to distill your water? I’ve heard in the past that it involves a lot of labor so I was quickly turned off to the idea- is there an easy way?[/quote]

nldasilva
Member
nldasilva

What about a water filter? We have one attached at our sink that we change every six months. [quote comment=”204604″]It’s as simple as buying one of these:

[/quote]

Stabone130
Member

Okay, so how do I distill my water?

wpDiscuz