More 1970’s Hoboken

Part II of the upcoming Hoboken in the 1970’s exhibit over at the Hoboken Historical Museum. This part of the exhibit with be located in the Upper Gallery.

1970’s Hoboken: Photographs by Caroline Carlson

Raised in Montclair, Caroline Carlson never thought she would end up working and living in Hoboken, but she plunged into the city on an assignment from Stevens Tech for an exhibit comparing historic buildings from Hoboken’s past to their present state. She was soon drawn into the life of the city and began working with the Model Cities program documenting its citywide cultural and arts program in the summer of 1970. This led to a project with the Christian Reformed Church at Third and Hudson, a mission church catering largely to the Hispanic community. She worked with the children of the Church’s congregation and of the 60 Garden Street Association to teach photography and create a magazine, “The Miracle Mile Mirror,” which showcased the children’s photographs, along with poetry and essays the children wrote and collected from their friends and family.

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For her solo show in the Upper Gallery of the museum, “1970s Hoboken,” which opens January 21, with a reception from 2 – 5 p.m., Carlson chose 14 photos from her many photo safaris based on their artistic merits, as well as representing a cross-section of life in the city. Scenes include iconic images such as the procession of the Madonna dei Martiri statue and the ferry terminal, as well as quotidian scenes, including artists, workers, tenement apartment interiors, and lots of kids and families hanging out on stoops and in vacant lots. Prints of the images will be available for purchase. The exhibit runs through March 18.

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14 Comments on "More 1970’s Hoboken"


SarahC
Member
9 years 8 months ago
True, true. As I sit here thinking about my hometown and its relative homogeneity (on the surface), we still had the “rich” people who lived “on the hill” and the “poor” people “below the tracks”. Extend that to the social structure of your stereotypical high school with its cheerleaders and band nerds and so forth. It’s human nature. I guess what offended my 1990’s politically correct sensibilities when I came here was listening to my first land lady – an otherwise sweet, little old Italian lady -using racial epithets that I didn’t even recognize. 🙂 Had to ask my dad since he seemed well-versed (the prejudices were there – they just didn’t come out as often as they might if the offending ethnic group had moved in next door). Perhaps some of it is cultural too (meaning the culture of the region, not any particular ethnic group or landlady) – I think we were raised that it was more “polite” to whisper your suspicions about people behind their backs, whereas people here are more blunt. And I can’t count the number of times someone has asked, “What ARE you?” Still not sure if they’re asking about my ethnicity, religious background, or something else. This question never came up where I’m from because everyone was pretty much just a non-descript average white person. I actually envy people with a strong attachment to their background and traditions because I have none of that. Most of my friends here are first- or second-generation… Read more »
MidnightRacer
Member
9 years 8 months ago
SarahC, I doubt is has anything to do with race. Perhaps more to do with how our brains are wired from development – growing up. A stranger and family move into a town. Residents, being human, are automatically distrustful and fear the unknown – blame the primitive section of the brain responsible for survival instincts, the brain stem. Then follows the friends and aquaintences of the stranger who all seek local jobs. At night, they all chug full glasses of beer at the local pubs… “Sullivan’s anyone?” The established locals will seperate into two camps. The strangers will seperate into two camps. In one camp, a percentage of the established residents and strangers will mingle, play darts, get into playful fights and form bonds – buying each other brewskies every Thursday. In the second camp, a percentage of established residents and strangers will keep to themselves and begin gossiping about the “others” – whereby rumor somehow becomes false “truth”. These spread like wild fire and begins a brew. Logical fallacies thrive to try to explain perceived injustices and persecutes those who are have done nothing but carry a pigment of epidermal hue. What’s the difference between the those two groups who mingle and those who keep to themselves? The amount of activity in the frontal lobes of the brain as a proportion of dominance over the manipulative brain stem. Where the brain stem causes us to carry caution and mistrust, the Frontal Lobes act as the older brother who reasons… Read more »
SarahC
Member
9 years 8 months ago

Would that all the exchanges on this site were as thoughtful and civil as this one…

As a transplant to New Jersey from 99%-white, small-town U.S.A., I never witnessed blatant racism/classism until I came here (I guess it’s easy to keep the peace in a homogenous place that hasn’t change dramatically in decades). It startled me a bit, me thinking that in a diverse environment people would be MORE tolerant of each other (clearly naive on my part).

Hearing stories like these helps me to understand the roots of people’s viewpoints here. Thanks for sharing your history and perspectives. It’s fascinating to hear what a different place this was not so long along.

Journey
Member
Journey
9 years 8 months ago

Cause and effect…

A developer sees the potential for earnings in a market. He buys some land at a good price and builds on it to maximize his earnings. People move into the development. Their success inspires other developers, prices go up; more people sell their land, more new projects go up. Prices continue to rise. Other developers see the potential for commercial ventures to sell goods and services to the new population. On and on it goes.

It happens here, very clearly. It happens in places like Turnersville NJ. The old timers there had farms; replaced by Ticky-Tacky houses; that are replaced by McMansions. Old farmers with English surnames replaced by Irish and Italian families from South Philly, one day the Irish/Italian families, who are pushed out by more affluent folk. The only real farm-market left down there is Duffields Farm Market in Sewell (both Sewell and Turnersville are part of Washington Township).

I’ve moved to Hoboken. I didn’t build the 2-unit condo I live in. I didn’t make the owner sell the land to a developer. Yes, the building was once a bakery. The baker’s family that owned it still has a bakery in town. We just bought the unit from the people that bought it from the developer and lived there for a few years.

random jerk
Member
random jerk
9 years 8 months ago

My dad and uncles say the exact same thing about fighting between whites and Puerto Ricans. He said that there was a general perception amongst the white community that the Hispanics were ruining the neighborhoods and bringing in crime, drugs, etc. Not saying this was true, but a lot of people thought so at the time. There were fights everyday, especially amongst teenagers who saw the demographics of their schools and neighborhoods changing.

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