NeighborGoods: Would it work in Hoboken?

11/17/2010:

Community Sharing: helpful in a down economy

Would NeighborGoods bring together residents, create a stronger community?

Hoboken resident Emeri is working on getting a Masters Degree in Interactive Telecomm at NYU – and thought that this new “safe community sharing” website that was recently launched would be of great interest to Mile Square residents:

What is NeighborGoods?

NeighborGoods (“Neighborhood goods”) is great site for Hoboken if our community used it. As of now there are only a few Hoboken members.

NeighborGoods is a safe community where you can save money and resources by sharing stuff with your friends. Need a ladder? Borrow it from your neighbor. Have a bike collecting dust in your closet? Rent it out for some extra cash!

Save Money!
How much money do you waste on stuff you only use once or twice? How much stuff do you have hidden away in closets or storage that isn’t being used? NeighborGoods is a social inventory that helps us all get more value out of the stuff we already own.

Save Resources!
Did you know that Americans are spend $22 billion a year on self-storage? According to The Self Storage Association, there is over seven square feet of self-storage for every man, woman and child in America. That’s a lot of unused stuff! NeighborGoods helps us get more use out of that stuff, which means less waste and less production of unnecessary items.

Strengthen Your Community!
Not only does NeighborGoods provide a way to save money and resources – it also connects neighbors in meaningful ways making for happier, healthier neighborhoods.

It seems as if they’ve built some pretty reliable “trust mechanisms” in place for this social inventory network. From creating custom lists of trustworthy friends and acquaintances, to a paid “verification system” that would likely weed out many of the spammers and scammers.

Would you use this service?

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5 Comments on "NeighborGoods: Would it work in Hoboken?"

iforgotmymantra
Member
iforgotmymantra

I should also note that I agree with the thought that an interactive community (without government involvement) could be a positive byproduct of NeighborGoods. Forums like Hoboken411 accomplish this goal too, though.

camel2
Member
camel2

See your point mantra, but something needs to be done to bring communities together, help them save money. That’s what the tribes of centuries past did. At least the government isn’t involved with this. I’d think this is a much better alternative to large global charities where you have no idea where your time and money really goes.

“Help thy brother out..?”

Bonnie
Member
Bonnie

I see your point, this would keep the money in the community and bring people together. I’m not cynical like Mantra seems to be, and I think people are generally considerate of, and helpful towards, their fellow neighbors.[quote comment=”200107″]See your point mantra, but something needs to be done to bring communities together, help them save money. That’s what the tribes of centuries past did. At least the government isn’t involved with this. I’d think this is a much better alternative to large global charities where you have no idea where your time and money really goes.“Help thy brother out..?”[/quote]

iforgotmymantra
Member
iforgotmymantra

Sure, I agree the theory is noble. The application just won’t be. The NeighborGoods emails would be frustrating to no end, soon to be ranked at the status of all your coupon emails. Especially for busy people with already-crammed inboxes.

It’s hard enough just finding the time & energy carrying our own stuff we don’t want down to the curb so a neighbor can have the benefit of its use. Instead it just sits in our closets and hallways.

I’m not trying to be critical, I just don’t see it happening.[quote comment=”200107″]See your point mantra, but something needs to be done to bring communities together, help them save money. That’s what the tribes of centuries past did. At least the government isn’t involved with this. I’d think this is a much better alternative to large global charities where you have no idea where your time and money really goes.“Help thy brother out..?”[/quote]

iforgotmymantra
Member
iforgotmymantra

I would not in a million years want to be bothered with this. It may sound like a nice fluffy idea in theory but it would create A LOT more hassle than it’s worth.

I would end up being the person with the stuff that constantly got borrowed, and my guess is that it would come back in shoddier condition. Also the possible liability issues that I see arising have my head spinning. What if someone fell off your ladder, or got hurt with your power saw, and then claimed you, as owner, negligently maintained them? How do you prove the borrower may have been the one who damaged it? What recourse do you have if someone borrows your lawn mower and never bring it back? What if they suck up a nest of ants with your vacuum and your place gets infested?

This sounds like another corner car scheme – and I’m not down with it! If you want to have nice functional things – buy ’em instead of blowing all your money on other expensive sh*t you don’t need like dinners at LUA!

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