Drunks steal gorgeous Hoboken sunflower

9/10/2010:

Disrespectful display of selfishness and stupidity

Hoboken411 reader William noticed that a beautiful and massive sunflower that used to bring glowing smiles to many Hobokenites – was destroyed last weekend.

“Sometime during Labor Day weekend, the 13 foot tall sunflower grown by the preschoolers at Steven’s Preschool on 3rd and Bloomfield was destroyed by some drunk buffoon.

Last years students planted the sunflowers, and one grew to be an amazing giant flower, that brightened the days of the people in the neighborhood, and the students in the school. Today as the children arrived at school for the first time, they were greeted with smashed flower remnants. Last years students had already made plans to come back to the school and measure the growth of the flower. Would love to see this covered on Hoboken411, so that whoever received the flower from their idiotic drunk boyfriend can at least feel bad about ruining an amazing flower grown by a bunch of preschoolers.”

The sad thing is – that whomever took this flower must have quickly discarded it after it died.

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9 Comments on "Drunks steal gorgeous Hoboken sunflower"

riotmike
Member
riotmike

this makes me sick!! no one can have anything nice in this town anymore. there’s always some idiot that comes along and destroys it!!

AtomicTMan
Member
AtomicTMan

On one hand whoever did this really is just a miserable asshole. On the other hand, you have a new kindergarten school that was built across the street from both a bar and a homeless shelter, and located one block off of the main drag of party town, NJ. Unfortunate, but not really a big surprise.

homeworld
Member

Someone stole my plants once from in front of my building, too.

iforgotmymantra
Member
iforgotmymantra

Well, it sounds like your plants are alive and well someplace else – not destroyed!

When I lived in Chicago this old lady next door to me had this ceramic planter with flowers that she tended to every day. It was her little garden, and she was proud of it. One night someone smashed it to smithereens all over her stoop. I’m sure she would have rathered see it stolen.[quote comment=”197189″]Someone stole my plants once from in front of my building, too.[/quote]

NotBornButRaised
Member
NotBornButRaised

It’s too bad that these kids have to learn at such a young age what fools some people can be. Hopefully, time will fog their memory enough so that they remember the giant sunflower but not its unfortunate demise.

I need to confess something here. I was once an accomplice to a sunflower murder. My friends and I removed a sunflower from the grassy area by 6th and Willow in the early ’90s. We somehow thought that we’d have an endless supply of sunflower seeds and that we’d never have to buy them at Willow Grocery again. We were still young and stupid at the time and it was an average size sunflower, but I still feel bad about it.

mooshu
Member
mooshu
“It’s too bad that these kids have to learn at such a young age what fools some people can be.” I love sunflowers. And kids. But I disagree with that statement. To me, every “crisis” presents an opportunity to learn and rebuild and adapt to changing environments and become stronger. These kids can learn a great deal about loss and consequences in this gentle example (compared with all other ways they might learn about consequences in the future). So, I think that these kids should mourn the flower if they must after learning the truth, then dust themselves off, and replant another sunflower. Maybe even two or five sunflowers to stick it to the idiots who ripped the life out of the first one. This is real life, not Disneyworld. There are people with destructive intentions all over the place, and we shouldn’t neglect that nor shield anyone’s eyes from them, including the eyes of children (who pretty much trust anyone and everyone). [quote comment=”197185″]It’s too bad that these kids have to learn at such a young age what fools some people can be. Hopefully, time will fog their memory enough so that they remember the giant sunflower but not its unfortunate demise.I need to confess something here. I was once an accomplice to a sunflower murder. My friends and I removed a sunflower from the grassy area by 6th and Willow in the early ’90s. We somehow thought that we’d have an endless supply of sunflower seeds and that… Read more »
iforgotmymantra
Member
iforgotmymantra

Well…I wouldn’t feel too bad about it if it was in an open grassy area and there were other flowers. The flower at Steven’s Preschool was more obviously someone’s labor of love.[quote comment=”197185″]It’s too bad that these kids have to learn at such a young age what fools some people can be. Hopefully, time will fog their memory enough so that they remember the giant sunflower but not its unfortunate demise.I need to confess something here. I was once an accomplice to a sunflower murder. My friends and I removed a sunflower from the grassy area by 6th and Willow in the early ’90s. We somehow thought that we’d have an endless supply of sunflower seeds and that we’d never have to buy them at Willow Grocery again. We were still young and stupid at the time and it was an average size sunflower, but I still feel bad about it.[/quote]

NotBornButRaised
Member
NotBornButRaised

Thanks, I hadn’t thought about it in that way. I think there were other sunflowers there, so maybe it wasn’t a big deal.

I can’t even imagine the look of disappointment on those kids’ faces. Such a bad way to start the school year. Since they’re so young, I hope they can move on quickly. I imagine they’re pretty resilient at that age.[quote comment=”197192″]Well…I wouldn’t feel too bad about it if it was in an open grassy area and there were other flowers. The flower at Steven’s Preschool was more obviously someone’s labor of love.

[/quote]

la-di-da
Member
la-di-da

One thing is a fact: the person who did this has no appreciation for life’s little joys. It’s nice to be not at all like that person.

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