Junior Hoboken Police Academy Photos

8/21/2010 Update:

Hoboken Junior Police Academy Graduation at Stevens

Photos from yesterday’s Junior Police Academy Graduation at Stevens Institute. The ceremony lasted about an hour, with a summer BBQ afterward. Congrats to the 42 kids that completed the program! And kudos to the Hoboken Police Department for making it possible.

Thanks to Ian from East View Photography for snapping the photos for Hoboken411!

8/20/2010:

The Hoboken Community Policing Unit is a great asset to the city. Besides getting involved with a more hands-on approach with residents – they hold annual events as well. The recent National Night Out – was a fun-filled and educational evening with residents of all ages. And just this week, the Junior Police Academy was held over at Stevens Institute. That “Summer Camp with Badges” wraps up this morning with a graduation ceremony on the Stevens campus – and a BBQ afterward. Read more below…

Youth Week revitalized & upgraded

“The department’s second summer event was held during the week of August 16th through August 20th. That was the Junior Police Academy for ages 12 to 15 years old. Chief Anthony P. Falco wanted to bring back what was originally named Youth Week, with a few enhancements to the program creating a police academy simulated environment.

This event was coordinated by Sgt. Melissa Gigante, and Officers Jason Falco, Anthony Fesken, and Dan Simone, III. 42 Hoboken pre-teens and teenagers embarked on the Stevens Tech campus every morning at 8:45 to begin a full day of exercise, drill, demonstrations, presentations and most importantly learning about teamwork.

They were met every morning by their drill instructor Sgt. Mike Ciriello of the New Jersey Transit Police Department, who immediately began drilling home the importance of self-discipline. Every day was spent on the Stevens campus except for Wednesday, when the class was taken on a field trip to see the Essex County Police Academy, in order to get a first hand view of the type of facility that is used several times a year for 26 weeks to certify police officers from around the entire state. The week culminates with a Friday graduation ceremony at 11:00 a.m. at Stevens’ Kidde Hall followed by a barbecue with our chef, Eddie Rivera.”

“Chief Falco and Lt. Ken Ferrante would like to thank the following contributors:

  • Stevens Institute of Technology and its Interim University President George Korfietis, for the use of the campus and many of its wonderful facilities,
  • Stevens Tech Police Department’s Chief Tim Griffin, who is always there with support for our department, and all of his officers who graciously assisted during the week,
  • The Applied Companies for their generous donation that enabled the students to receive shirts, hats, bags, and water bottles,
  • The Hoboken Puerto Rican Cultural Committee and its President Raul Morales for their donation which helped provide for the graduation ceremony,
  • PSE&G for their donation,
  • The Essex County Police Academy for allowing the children a full day’s use of their facility,
  • New Jersey Transit Police for providing us with Sgt. Ciriello to be our drill instructor,
  • ESPN boxing analyst and world champion trainer Teddy Atlas for his motivational speech on the academy’s first day,
  • The New Jersey State Police,
  • The Hudson County Prosecutor’s Office,
  • Our own P.A.L. Director Bobby Gohde,
  • P.O. Cesar Olivarria of the Institute of Defensive Methods for his self-defense instruction,
  • Luca Brasi’s for supplying the students’ lunches every day,
  • Atlantic Tropical for supplying fruit for the students each morning,
  • A & P Supermarket for their donations of food and supplies,
  • Director Carmelo Garcia and ALSTO bus company for supplying the bus for Wednesday’s class trip,
  • The Jersey City Police Department’s Emergency Service Unit, K-9 Unit and Bomb Squad’s Amelio Ramos,
  • Hoboken Police Motorcycle Squad’s P.O. John Alvarez and P.O. William Montanez,
  • Graduation Day chef Eddie Rivera and D.J. Taz, Feliciano Santos, and all the members of the Hoboken Police Department and the Community Policing Unit, especially the event coordinators and a special thank you and congratulations to all the students who participated and completed the one-week instructional course.

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8 Comments on "Junior Hoboken Police Academy Photos"

dwright5
Member
dwright5

My car was stolen last week, luckily it was found by the Hoboken police. The GPS, My insurance card and registration card were taken, apon return of the car i noticed that there was recete of a gas purchase at a local gas station that was not mine (cops did not see this) i asked the police to investigate after i asked the gas station if there were security cameras available to which they said yes. I asked not just because there would more than likely be a veisual of the person (people) who stole my car but if that credit card wasnt mine maybe someone else would be looking for them as well.

The Hoboken police’s response “we are not going to look into this any further, we don’t have the time, you got your car back no harm no foul” then i was asked to leave the police station.

I really hope the new guys are better trained then that crap they have working in this town now, we should be happy some are getting laid off i just hope its the right ones

Cracker
Member

keep a look out for these future narcs!

escaped68
Member

When my son went to school the junior narcs were found in the dumpster behind the school on a regular basis.[quote comment=”196435″]keep a look out for these future narcs![/quote]

emarche
Member

“Civil service jobs like cops and firemen are for the betterment of the community versus bloated corporations with eight or nine figure executives only in it for the money.”

Sure about that? Because last time I checked, there were more than a few local cops who seemed to be more focused on the money than on the betterment of our community. And as far as those ‘bloated corporations’ go, well…they make money. Some of them make lots of money. Some of them make lots of money selling products and services to YOU, the consumer, which means you’re keeping them in business and, therefore, paying their salary. So basically you’re part of the problem, aren’t you? Jackass.

Here’s what I’d love to see, just once: any one of you who keep firing off the hackneyed, please-stop-beating-that-horse-it-is-WAY-beyond-dead cliche about “Bloated Corporations” to be offered the salary that some of these executives are getting paid. My guess is that you’d lose your sanctimony pretty damn quick and would gladly accept the pay, forgoing giving 85-95% of it to your local community, homeless shelter, etc. The bottom line is that many of these executives slogged their guts out to get where they are and while I don’t necessarily agree with all of their decisions, they’ve earned the right to make those decisions – you have not.

jc5201
Member
jc5201

Did the future cops have any training on how to deal with future layoffs?

Easy-E
Member

Training?

For what? How to go get another job?

I just don’t understand why it’s any different for cops, teachers, firemen or anyone else that works for the government. As soon as someone starts talking about layoffs some people lose their minds.

People lose their jobs all the time, so what’s the big deal? Sure it sucks, I feel bad for anyone that loses their job to a layoff. They have families and bills to pay just like everyone else. And like everyone else, they can go get new jobs.

Am I missing something here, because I just don’t get what the problem is. What makes them any different to any other citizen?[quote comment=”196385″]Did the future cops have any training on how to deal with future layoffs?[/quote]

john14
Member
john14

Civil service jobs like cops and firemen are for the betterment of the community versus bloated corporations with eight or nine figure executives only in it for the money.

What they need money to support outside of work could be similar but their contributions to society are far different.[quote comment=”196389″]Training?For what? How to go get another job? I just don’t understand why it’s any different for cops, teachers, firemen or anyone else that works for the government. As soon as someone starts talking about layoffs some people lose their minds.People lose their jobs all the time, so what’s the big deal? Sure it sucks, I feel bad for anyone that loses their job to a layoff. They have families and bills to pay just like everyone else. And like everyone else, they can go get new jobs.Am I missing something here, because I just don’t get what the problem is. What makes them any different to any other citizen?

[/quote]

Easy-E
Member

“Civil service jobs like cops and firemen are for the betterment of the community versus bloated corporations with eight or nine figure executives only in it for the money.”

I don’t know why you’re bringing up corporations with me, not sure I get the point. I’m not a corporation and I don’t work for a corporation. everyone does a job to make a living. Some people do jobs for noble reasons, but that doesn’t mean every noble career is staffed by people who are only in it for altruistic reasons.

“What they need money to support outside of work could be similar but their contributions to society are far different.”

Could be? Everyone has bills to pay. families to raise, you, me , them, we’re all exactly the same in that respect.

People do all kinds of jobs that provide things for the betterment of society, and they still get the axe from time to time.[quote comment=”196390″]Civil service jobs like cops and firemen are for the betterment of the community versus bloated corporations with eight or nine figure executives only in it for the money.What they need money to support outside of work could be similar but their contributions to society are far different.

[/quote]

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