Massive Brownstone Awnings

8/9/2010:

[Continuing the ORIGINAL Hoboken411 “Photo of the Day” series…]

Are awnings supposed to be so close to the ground?

Uptown, there’s a few brownstones along Bloomfield Street that have these unusually massive awnings. So big, that only a lilliputian could effectively walk under them without having to bend over.

I opted not to take the “History of Awnings” elective in school, so my untrained eye thinks this “style” was either a short-lived trend in the home decorating world, or they just bought them a couple sizes too big. I can see something like this working if you had a door that was 15 feet high – but here? Unless it was done on purpose to save on home cooling costs.

Anyone know for sure?

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7 Comments on "Massive Brownstone Awnings"

AndyT
Member
AndyT

They were intentionally low to block the sun in the days before air conditioning and even electricity. To do an accuate restoration project the awning should look like that. I plan to do the same on my home. All of the brownstones had them. The blocks must have looked beautifull with all that color rather than the current bland brownstone house after house in a row.

escaped68
Member

There was a time where most of the stores on washington street had some type of awnings to block the sun. One side had them down in the morning the other side in the afternoon.

whineanddineinhob
Member
whineanddineinhob

I remember that. It stopped mdse from fading. A lot of merchants actually used it only for blocking sun. If it rained, many rolled them up to avoid molding.[quote comment=”195869″]There was a time where most of the stores on washington street had some type of awnings to block the sun. One side had them down in the morning the other side in the afternoon.[/quote]

escaped68
Member

Also an occasional smoldering fire from someone tossing a cigarette butt up into the folder up awning.[quote comment=”195871″]I remember that. It stopped mdse from fading. A lot of merchants actually used it only for blocking sun. If it rained, many rolled them up to avoid molding.

[/quote]

winesnob
Member

I remember when I bought my house in 2002 the first thing I did was rip down the awning over the front door…my neighbors comment was “another Italian home bites the dust to a Yuppie” 😯

getz76
Member
getz76

I find their comment insulting to Italians. :)[quote comment=”195836″]I remember when I bought my house in 2002 the first thing I did was rip down the awning over the front door…my neighbors comment was “another Italian home bites the dust to a Yuppie” [/quote]

whineanddineinhob
Member
whineanddineinhob

Don’t take offense getz. I’m willing to bet it WAS intentionally done to save on home cooling cost. New budget conscious owners would normally ask how much it cost to heat a home in winter and cool in summer. These low awnings probably saved something on their bills. Have your window shades or blinds up all day and note the difference from having them down. These Italians were smart, and let others worry about appearance.[quote comment=”195837″]I find their comment insulting to Italians.

[/quote]

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