What property tax cap?

7/16/2010 Update:

What does it really mean besides politics?

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is known to many as the “toughest” Governor in the lay of the land.

Much of that may be true – but for the purpose of this update, what do you think the recent passage of the “so-called” two-percent tax-cap means?

You see, the thing with political moves, bills, resolutions, and so on – is that they make them so verbose, complicated and difficult to understand – that the everyday person doesn’t truly know what it means. Look at the 2000+ page bills that are being passed left and right in Congress – that even our own Representatives don’t get! They give these bills “titles,” and roll with it without really comprehending how it affects the citizens of our country.

Many Hoboken residents have emailed 411 wondering the same thing, trying to discern “fluff and propaganda” from what the real deal is.

  • Some locals said that Christie’s tax cap bill is meaningless without the other bills he wants passed
  • Others think that the same loopholes will crop up – similar to Corzine’s 4% tax cap (with broader exemptions) which dozens of municipalities bypassed – despite Christie’s statements to the contrary. Will that hold true here? Stay tuned to find out.
  • I actually had a couple Hoboken residents willing to BET me that Hoboken’s tax bills will go up beyond the tax cap during Mayor Dawn Zimmer’s tenure – with her stating some “rare” anomaly as the reasoning behind it. I wouldn’t take the bet.
  • Lastly, PolitickerNJ had this to say: “So how will the Governor’s “tool kits” help us? By holding the total tax levy within a municipality to no more than 2.5% per year. And how does he know this is going to help? The model program, “Proposition 2.5” from Massachusetts, significantly lowered property taxes on its citizens. One slight problem: New Jersey’s structure is vastly different from Massachusetts. First and foremost, when Proposition 2.5 was passed, Massachusetts increased state aid to its local governments by 95%; a 30% increase from the national average at the time. Needless to say, Governor Christies proposal does not offer similar boosts in local aid.”

Many Hoboken residents have rightfully shrugged this latest political maneuver off as “complete BS,” while others didn’t care one bit – citing similar “historic” moments that failed in the past.

Do you think Christie’s “actions” are legitimate? Or just more faux “good news” to fool the populous into thinking there is actually light on the horizon?

See previous updates and videos from Christie’s visit to Hoboken after the jump…

6/29/2010 Update:

Is this tax cap even feasible?

Municipalities already raising well above proposed 2.5% cap

While many applaud NJ Governor Chris Christie’s efforts to curtail spending in the state (could he be a sleeper candidate for the next Presidential election?) – dozens of cities in the Garden State are continuing to raise taxes. Both cities that signed up to Chrisitie’s plan to cap property tax increases at 2.5% – and others that have gone way beyond the already established limit of 4%.

See article here.

How do you think your Hoboken tax bills will look for the upcoming eight quarters?

5/18/2010 Update:

TV News Channels also cover Hoboken Town Hall meeting

Another perspective from My9/Fox5 reporter Mike Gilliam on yesterday’s “Town Hall” meeting. It should be noted that most news reports included Zimmer’s Corzine gaffe. This piece includes some comments from attendees:

5/17/2010 Update:

Video of Chris Christie’s visit to Hoboken

For the 99.99% of the Hoboken residents that weren’t on Mayor Dawn Zimmer’s private invite list – here’s a brief video overview of some highlights of Chris Christie’s speech – along with what some residents who weren’t allowed in had to say.

Oh – and here’s the 150 page, 33 bill “tool kit” that Gov. Christie has been referring to.

5/17/2010:

Hoboken 1st of many NJ cities on Christie’s Tax Cap tour

This morning, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie headlined a “Town Hall” meeting at the Hoboken Catholic Academy gymnasium (555 7th Street.)

The event was attended by about 100 people, who were on Mayor Dawn Zimmer’s private invite list. The meeting started off with Christie discussing his proposed property tax increase cap of 2.5% and a “tool kit” provided to local municipalities – then was followed by a Q&A session with attendees. Zimmer inadvertently introduced Christie as Jon Corzine at the beginning of the meeting.

Outside the meeting hall, was a group of protesters upset that they were denied entrance, and felt that only the “elitists” that support Christie and Zimmer were allowed in.

Christie was said to have chosen Hoboken as his first stop in an effort to get the maximum NYC media coverage to kick-off his statewide tour.

Relevant and easy to digest video and full story later…

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56 Comments on "What property tax cap?"

blahblahblah
Member
blahblahblah

the fact that the CEO of Horizon BCBS of NJ was handed 9 million in pay at a time when premiums are hurting towns and none of the revolters, or cronies on here say squat is indicative of the fact that they have tunnel vision when it comes to the “unions” or other pay for folks. WELL, at least it got the attention of the legislature. Hopefully some reform can be made and control the pay of these crooks and help control the cost of premiums for health care.

exm
Member

The issue is not the base salaries, but items like:
– overtime
– retirement costs
– health care costs
– too much overhead [positions]

Now the REAL problem are the unions who oppose any change to make the issues above more in line with the private world. No one asks teachers (and other public workers) for a massive pay cut; just to be more in line with us ‘normal’ workers so we can ALL enjoy more reasonable taxes.

Go Christie.

rich k
Member
rich k

Matt, my apologies, my response to to your post 50 was linked to your post 47 instead. To err is human, to really screw up requires technology.

NJPoliticalMerc
Member
NJPoliticalMerc

Let’s all thank Dawn for getting Hoboken on the news again. Instead of the usual corruption scandal, we get the distinction of electing a mayor who can’t even remember who SHE invited to speak. With the corruption scandals we at least get “street cred” but this was just embarrassing. Thanks again “Ditsy Dawn”!

rich k
Member
rich k
Charter schools work the way HMOs did when they were saving everyone money in the ’80s, by cherry picking the best students (or healthiest “patients”). Once ALL schools are charter schools, there’s no place to bounce the “underperforming” students back to, and the charter school teachers have to start working as hard as they should have worked in the current schools. Since charter schools attract the best teachers in the same way, once all schools are charter schools skimming of the best talent off the top also no longer works. Administrators are back to actually evaluating teachers, weeding out the bad ones and rewarding the good ones, and insisting on continual training for all, which they should be doing now. Oh, and charter school teachers tend to be paid higher than the average, since they are the best at their profession. So cut out the middle step and force administrators and the teachers unions to work together to improve the CURRENT schools. It will cost less than the temporary savings of charter schools. Set state-wide standards on how much administrative and teacher jobs can pay, with a little wiggle room for variables like the size of districts, or the need to restructure a failing district. The latter should be in the form of salary put into escrow until the improvement is shown to be lasting, not band aids. Exemptions to the wage caps should only be made if a majority of the residents (not active voters or even registered voters)… Read more »
matt_72
Member
You almost had me until I read that last paragraph. You do realize that when the marginal tax rate got jacked up to that insane 90% threshold we slipped back into a recession that didn’t end until after WW2. Please tell me you didn’t ignore that little fact. The only reason our country was at its economic peak back then was because practically all of the industrialized world except the US was in ruins and we were the only economic power capable of making ships, planes, cars, ovens, guns & almost everything else! Good luck trying to raise taxes back to 90%. Do that and I guarantee you that anyone with money to invest will invest it anywhere but here. You will do a great job or creating jobs then.[quote comment=”192455″]Charter schools work the way HMOs did when they were saving everyone money in the ’80s, by cherry picking the best students (or healthiest “patients”). Once ALL schools are charter schools, there’s no place to bounce the “underperforming” students back to, and the charter school teachers have to start working as hard as they should have worked in the current schools. Since charter schools attract the best teachers in the same way, once all schools are charter schools skimming of the best talent off the top also no longer works. Administrators are back to actually evaluating teachers, weeding out the bad ones and rewarding the good ones, and insisting on continual training for all, which they should be doing now.… Read more »
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