The origin of “Hoboken”

5/7/2010:

Interesting and informative exhibit at the Hoboken Historical Museum (13th & Hudson) tomorrow, May 8th – starting at 4pm.

Hoboken and the Lenape Indians

Curator of Ellis Island exhibit to speak

“Ever wonder where the name “Hoboken” comes from? Or who lived here when Henry Hudson made the first visit by a European to our shoreline? On Saturday, May 8 at 4 p.m., come hear a leading scholar on the Lenni Lenape people, Dr. David M. Oestreicher, tell the history of the Lenape from their Paleo-Indian predecessors to modern times. Admission is free for Museum members; a $2 donation is requested from other visitors. The talk is part of the Museum’s “Open River” Program, initiated in 2009, made possible by a generous grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

For over 12,000 years, the region that is now lower New York, New Jersey, eastern Pennsylvania, and Delaware was home to groups of Lenape (Delaware Indians) and their prehistoric predecessors. By the late 18th and early 19th centuries, however, after a tragic series of removals had taken them halfway across the continent, the broken remnants of these tribes finally settled in parts of Oklahoma, Wisconsin, and Ontario. By the late 20th century, only a handful of elders could still speak their native language, or had knowledge of the traditional ceremonies, religious beliefs, and life ways.

In a lively and engaging talk, David M. Oestreicher combines archaeological and historical evidence with decades of firsthand ethnographic and linguistic research among present-day Lenape traditionalists, to arrive at a full picture of the Lenape from prehistory to the present. A slide program features native artifacts, maps, illustrations, and photographs, as well as images of contemporary Lenape who are among the last repositories of their culture.

Dr. Oestricher is the curator of “Lenape: Ellis Island’s First Inhabitants,” at the Ellis Island Immigration Museum. The late renowned elder and traditionalist Touching Leaves Woman (Nora Thompson Dean, 1907-1984) called him her “Key in the East,” and she and other elders relied on Dr. Oestreicher to help preserve and disseminate knowledge of her people. A Lenape Tribe website’s “talking dictionary” lists the word “hupokan-haki-nk” as the transliteration of “place of the tobacco pipe,” which historians believe the early Dutch transcribed as “Hoboken.”

The original and smaller traveling version of the exhibition, “In Search of the Lenape: The Delaware Indians Past and Present,” has appeared at numerous historic sites. It won the 1995 award for excellence from the Lower Hudson Conference of Historical Agencies and Museums and was praised by William Zimmer as “an extended reverie, which captures the vitality and poignancy of the Lenape saga.” (New York Times) Oestreicher’s commemorative book on the Ellis Island Exhibition is forthcoming by SUNY Press. Dr. Oestreicher earned widespread acclaim for exposing a 19th century hoax about a supposed historical narrative of the Lenape people, called the Walam Olum.”

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16 Comments on "The origin of “Hoboken”"

KenOn10
Member
KenOn10

I always thought it would be cool to have 200-mile bike rally from Hoboken NJ to Hoboken NY. Biking to Hoboken GA would be too much….

tburns
Member

I do not claim to be a primary source; however, according to a good authority two of the people pictured above voted in the last mayoral election.

nacholibre
Member
nacholibre

I’m pretty sure it translates to “Whale’s vagina.”

Agree to disagree.

Margaret
Member

Excuse me, all of this information was given out and published
by me already, including the story of Touching Leaves and the naming of HOBOKEN. It is all on fullmoonoverhoboken.com and in the book Hoboken Captains, Fore and Aft..by M.A. O’Brien that is me…
It was given to the public school children back when the book was published and the Library had a book signing.

This is not new information. The Museum is being the museum again.

Journey
Member
Journey

Unless you are way older than you look, you were not here during Dutch time period, so you got the info from books yourself.

In response to Margaret who said:
Excuse me, all of this information was given out and published
by me already, including the story of Touching Leaves and the naming of HOBOKEN. It is all on fullmoonoverhoboken.com and in the book Hoboken Captains, Fore and Aft..by M.A. O’Brien that is me…
It was given to the public school children back when the book was published and the Library had a book signing.

This is not new information. The Museum is being the museum again.

Margaret
Member

Excuse me, I did twelve years of research to publish that book.
If you look at fullmoonoverhoboken.com you can read TWO books
going back to the first residents here. Maps from the 16th century, inventions that were done here, Native aAmerican stories, a kidnapping of an early Dutch family, the first governor ( he was a real bad dude)…Lenape Chief Oratam,
including Touching Leaves Woman who named Hoboken, Weehawken and Secaucus, and the first Mayor of Hoboken who was a laxative salesman. The Buffalo races were hilarious also. If you like to read try it out…It is FREE and copyrighted by the Library of Congress. Margaret

In response to Journey who said:
Unless you are way older than you look, you were not here during Dutch time period, so you got the info from books yourself.

Journey
Member
Journey

I looked at your site. 1stbooks.com comes up dead. I can find all of this info in much easier to read books. Excessive and unnecessary capitalization gives me head aches.[quote comment=”191966″]Excuse me, I did twelve years of research to publish that book.
If you look at fullmoonoverhoboken.com you can read TWO books
going back to the first residents here. Maps from the 16th century, inventions that were done here, Native aAmerican stories, a kidnapping of an early Dutch family, the first governor ( he was a real bad dude)…Lenape Chief Oratam,
including Touching Leaves Woman who named Hoboken, Weehawken and Secaucus, and the first Mayor of Hoboken who was a laxative salesman. The Buffalo races were hilarious also. If you like to read try it out…It is FREE and copyrighted by the Library of Congress. Margaret In response to Journey who said:

[/quote]

escaped68
Member

The real way hoboken received its name; there was a indian riding along on his horse boken when someone asked him the name of that village over there? He pulled up and said to his horse”ho boken”. That was a dumb joke in grammer school and it didn’t get better with age.

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