Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution

5/29/2010 Update:

A food revolution in Hoboken?

This year, 33 year old Hoboken mom Peta Moran started a School Lunch Blog called EAT Hoboken – detailing the quality of food served at the St. Francis Early Learning Childhood Center (310 Jackson St.) when her 5 year old daughter Olivia complained about her lunch. She blogs about each and every meal served.

Since then, she’s started getting support from the school as well as the food service company that supplies the lunches. Minor improvements, such as fresh fruits and salads have replaced sugary, syrupy alternatives.

And yesterday – Jamie Oliver’s blog picked up on her story as well. Congrats, Peta!

4/14/2010:

America needs Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution!

The last few years, my TV watching free time has diminished greatly with the herculean effort I put in to run 411. However, I will be taking some time out to watch Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution on ABC this season (I’ve watched three episodes so far online)…

Have any of you caught this show yet? I didn’t know about Jamie Oliver until recently – but he embarked on a campaign back in 2005 to change the way school lunches were served over in the U.K., asserting that the food was unhealthy, and contributed to a number of avoidable problems for the kids. Despite angry parents who felt the removal of junky food from school cafeterias was unfair – he claims it was a big success.

On Food Revolution, he brings his healthy recipes and lifestyle changes to Huntington, Virgina – which was recently deemed the unhealthiest city in America. While I’m not sure how much of the show is “scripted” (like many other so-called reality shows allegedly are) – this appears to be legit. It’s very eye-opening when you see how many people have forgotten the importance of a decent, balanced diet (including yours truly). Whether it’s time, stress or just plain corporate marketing and laziness – it truly is a problem of epidemic proportions!

If you want to gauge whether you’ll enjoy this series – I recommend at least watching episodes 101 through 103 online. Then I was sold!

Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution airs Friday nights at 9pm.

Leave a Reply

11 Comments on "Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution"

Bullbreed333
Member
Bullbreed333

I think Hoboken is ready for a healthy restaurant. There are some restaurants that offer healthy food already in town, but there is an opening here for a place that will really take it to another level with taste and sophistication. I’m not even talking about it being snobby or reserved for hipsters, but a simple place with educated tastes that are all-natural. There are lots of people here now who would gravitate to that. As far as price goes, if the food is awesome- people will pay for it, that’s the bottom line.

plywood
Member
plywood

Sorry, but I have a pet peeve about people randomly attacking businesses. Welcome to capitalism. The masses will decide if the prices are “fair”. There is no “bad” way to price a restaurant. If you sold an average of one celery stalk every three months for a million dollars and had no other customers and managed to stayed in business, there is nothing “wrong”. At the same time, many “healthy” restaurants may be seen as “playing the system” against the health conscious. However, it’s not a hobby. As soon as there are 8 “healthy” restaurants in a town instead of one novelty one, the owners have to respond with their price points to survive. It would seem that the demand isn’t there (yet).
Moreover, who amongst us truly understands what premium it costs to bring “healthy” restaurant food to market? That’s what started the crappy food ingredients problem in the first place. Good, responsibly raised food cost more to bring to market. That’s akin to saying “I’m not going to Harvard because they charge so much”. Bmacqueens is right then: I guess they’re not leading with trying to appeal to the price conscious.

upyurs
Member
upyurs

HOBOKEN 411 You need to make a correction to your lead in. It is not St Francis Learning Center. St Francis leases their space to the state and the center is run by the Hoboken Board of Education.

bmacqueens
Member

Big fan here. Granted, the producers want to find the most ignorant, un-food savvy people they can use for their segments, but boy did they find some. One family of giant-sized folks had nothing but frozen pizzas filling the freezer. Deep fried everything for food, using an old-school 1970’s fry boy (and that’s from someone who has his own deep fryer).

The grade school kids had no idea what the F- a fresh veggie looked like. Broccoli, potatoes, tomatoes, they couldn’t even name them when held up in front of their faces. Not just one kid, either. My 3-year old knew more when she was 2 than these kids do at about 1st or 2nd grade. One stroll down Washington Street and you can’t help but trip over a veggie stand, at least south of 7th Street, but these kids in West Virginia would have starved without a pile of tater tots and chicken nuggets.

I like what Jamie is trying to do and hope that it goes viral. Our garbage food is the root of our society’s medical problems, in large part, and changing the diet of the young will yield great dividends when they’re older.

krewedetat
Member
krewedetat

I don’t want to take anything away from what Jamie Oliver is doing, but he is far from the first high-profile chef to take an interest in improving school lunches. Alice Waters, through her Chez Panisse Foundation has run school edible gardening and healthy eating programs for years, but has done it in a smaller scale and without the help of commercial TV. The big problem is the reluctance on the part of the Federal Government to spend more than $2 and change per student on school lunches. Does anyone remember when the Secretary of Agriculture wanted to classify ketchup as a vegetable for school kids?

wpDiscuz