Day of Silence at Hudson School

4/13/2010:

Hudson School 9th Grader Corey Bernstein wants all Hoboken residents to know about the efforts the national youth movement is making to raise awareness about the bullying that takes place towards those with different sexual orientations. In addition to a guest speaker from Garden State Equality this Wednesday, they’re participating in a “day of silence” on Friday.

Hudson School students take part in a Day Of Silence

“Get ready for the campus to be a little quieter.

On Friday, April 16, students at The Hudson School will join students across the nation in a Day of Silence to protest the discrimination, harassment and abuse-in effect the silencing-faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students and their allies in schools.

The Day of Silence, a project of GLSEN, will be held during school hours at The Hudson School. Over 30% of students in grades 9-12 will be silent on Friday, wearing stickers, t-shirts and passing out ‘speaking cards’ that read:

“Please understand my reasons for not speaking today. I am participating in the Day of Silence, a national youth movement protesting the silence faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people and their allies in schools. My deliberate silence echoes that silence, which is caused by harassment, prejudice, and discrimination. I believe that ending the silence is the first step toward fighting these Injustices. Think about the voices you are not hearing today. What are you going to do to end the silence?”

“The Day of Silence,” according to local organizer, ninth grader Corey Bernstein, “is especially relevant to The Hudson School because of our diverse, accepting environment and our close ties to the community.” Bernstein hopes that the event will work towards ending some of the silence and hatred students face in our community and elsewhere in the nation.

GLSEN’s 2007 National School Climate Survey found that more than 9 out of 10 LGBT students report verbal, sexual or physical harassment at school and 30% report missing at least a day of school in the past month out of fear for their personal safety. The Day of Silence is one way students and their allies are making anti-LGBT bullying, harassment and name-calling unacceptable in America’s schools.

About the Day of Silence

The Day of Silence, a project of GLSEN, is a nationwide, student-led event during which hundreds of high schools and colleges protest the oppression of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth. For more Information and a complete collection of organizing materials, visit www.dayofsilence.org.

About GLSEN

GLSEN, or the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, is the leading national education organization focused on creating safe schools for all lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students. Established nationally in 1995, GLSEN envisions a world in which every child learns to respect and accept all people, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression. For more Information on our educator resources, public policy agenda, student organizing programs or development initiatives, visit www.glsen.org.

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31 Comments on "Day of Silence at Hudson School"

mooshu
Member
mooshu

Truth hurts.

mooshu
Member
mooshu

Kooks, when you get your head out of your ass, then you’ll be able to read what I wrote. I’ve worked in schools and continue to work with families. What do you do?

FYI, I can’t call you anything you’re already calling yourself, dear.

kooky kat
Member

LOL that was a nice response.

What could you say? I am fat? Ugly? Stupid? Oh wait…that would make you a BULLY!

kooky kat
Member

Does anyone else find it funny that mooshu, who herself is not a parent, comes to 411 to tell all the “stupid parents” in hoboken about how much they suck! Then berates all “the silly yuppies” for taking the bus into the city instead of the path because they are lazy and/or stupid (even if the commute to the PA makes 1000% more sense than the path for their particular job) is SICK TO DEATH of people defending the peratrators who bully others!! Sick of it!

Talk about a bully!

mooshu
Member
mooshu

Kooky, there is ton I could say about you, right now. But your name says it all. So, yeah. F you.

In response to kooky kat who said:
Does anyone else find it funny that mooshu, who herself is not a parent, comes to 411 to tell all the “stupid parents” in hoboken about how much they suck! Then berates all “the silly yuppies” for taking the bus into the city instead of the path because they are lazy and/or stupid (even if the commute to the PA makes 1000% more sense than the path for their particular job) is SICK TO DEATH of people defending the peratrators who bully others!! Sick of it!

Talk about a bully!

Hobokent
Member
Hobokent

I was raised in good ol’ middle America, where we (good) whites felt pretty much the same way towards: blacks, Hispanics, Asians, Jews, Catholics, Gays, (didn’t know about Lesbians), Arabs, fat kids, short kids, kids with acne, kids who didn’t have new clothes (did I miss any?) – All were equally deserving of our punishment. I never joined in the abuse, but I saw or heard it every day. I’m not saying that I was above it, but for some reason it never interested me, so it was mostly indifference; I never went out of my way to defend anyone.

It comes from somewhere and for us, it was our parents. I know, because I heard it at home or in other homes. Though something should be done for these kids, I can’t help but think that it is on some level unfair to those who (see above) dealt with the same crap forever with no one to stand-up for them.

All I can say for these kids is that they should thank God every single day they are in New Jersey in 2010 and not in the midwest back in the early 70’s.

HansBrix
Member
HansBrix

Yes, life is much better in earthly Edens such as Paterson, Passaic, and Camden than some backwards area like Plano.

In response to Hobokent who said:
I was raised in good ol’ middle America, where we (good) whites felt pretty much the same way towards: blacks, Hispanics, Asians, Jews, Catholics, Gays, (didn’t know about Lesbians), Arabs, fat kids, short kids, kids with acne, kids who didn’t have new clothes (did I miss any?) – All were equally deserving of our punishment. I never joined in the abuse, but I saw or heard it every day. I’m not saying that I was above it, but for some reason it never interested me, so it was mostly indifference; I never went out of my way to defend anyone.

It comes from somewhere and for us, it was our parents. I know, because I heard it at home or in other homes. Though something should be done for these kids, I can’t help but think that it is on some level unfair to those who (see above) dealt with the same crap forever with no one to stand-up for them.

All I can say for these kids is that they should thank God every single day they are in New Jersey in 2010 and not in the midwest back in the early 70’s.

mooshu
Member
mooshu

Ha. Thank you.

In response to HansBrix who said:
Yes, life is much better in earthly Edens such as Paterson, Passaic, and Camden than some backwards area like Plano.

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