Skechers Shape Ups

2/8/2010:

[This week’s post series is “Hoboken411 Product Reviews,” which will feature one item each day that may be of general interest to the readers. Each product is already owned and purchased by Hoboken411.]

Skechers Shape Ups – Hype or Real Deal?

Skechers Shape Ups ReviewMany of you who watched last night’s Super Bowl saw the many commercials for Skechers Shape Ups – sneakers that claim to “get you in shape” while walking.

These are fairly expensive (around $100 give or take), and not the most stylish shoes in the world. However, they seem to be taking off with customers. Essentially modeled after the original MBT shoes – by having a softer, curved sole – they’re designed to promote better posture, reduce joint strain, increase core and calf strength, and burn more calories while you walk. Customer reviews are quite positive.

I actually bought mine immediately after seeing a commercial on TV on New Years Eve.

Well, do they work?

I’ll get to that in a minute – After receiving my first pair – I was so thrilled at how comfortable these shoes were – that I instantly bought a second pair. Yes, that comfortable.

But after reading some of the reviews comparing them with the original MBT models, it appears that they don’t have the same “health benefits” that the latter models do (i.e., they don’t work the muscles as intensely.) However, those MBT’s are much more costly (3x more), and need to be re-soled often as they wear out quickly. I read that others have suffered the same fate with the Skechers brand, but instead of paying another $80 to fix them, you can just buy another pair.

As far as the physical benefits – I haven’t lost an ounce with these suckers yet (although I’ve only been wearing them for a month), but have noticed slightly increased calf strength and modestly better posture (I’m a sloucher). The warning messages about “getting used to” these new sneakers wasn’t necessary – you can walk just fine in them right away. No need to “practice.” But one thing you want to keep in mind is the fact that the soles are a bit thicker, and you might drag a foot or two accidentally in the beginning if you don’t watch the slope of the sidewalk… But I never tripped and fell like an idiot (yet).

But I walk between 5-10 miles per day on average – and have to say that the positive difference in terms of fatigue or joint soreness is incredible. Worth it for that reason alone.

They’re definitely “dorky” looking shoes, but who gives a darn what other people think. It’s your own comfort that counts!

Anyone else own a pair of either the Shape Up or the MBT shoes? Your thoughts?

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13 Comments on "Skechers Shape Ups"

escaped68
Member

I did a lot of running and I was killing my knees, I went to a real good running store and they use a computer to make a model of my style. this is when I found out about the 3 different types of running shoes.There are normal feet, there are pronators, and there are people who need stability. These type of stores can either give you the correct shoe or a combination of footwear and orthoics for you. so, my point is these shoes might not be for you, they are neutral and are for “normal” or neutral feet. If you don’t have “neutral” type feet you can cause serious damage to your knees.

strongevity
Member
strongevity

I do not have a PhD in Biomechanics or Exercise Physiology, but I have been around human kinetics for the better part of the last decade. The syndrome that this products treats is disconnected neuromuscular control. In other words: individuals are not controlling their muscles with their brains, so the level of development is marginal at best.

Take that ab belt that electrically shocked a person to a six-pack. The idea is that the belt does what your brain is supposed to–activate your abs. So, by circumventing the designated system (your body) and using an external effector (Shape Ups, Electric Ab Belt, etc.) you are sticking a band-aid on a tomahawk wound.

divetrash
Member
divetrash

Ah yes, well in my case, my brain isn’t communicating all that well with my left foot. I damaged the L5 nerve (which runs down the inside of the left leg and controls the foot and ankle) in the accident. It’s healing but I don’t have the kind of movement in the foot and ankle yet that I used to. So forcing the heel/toe movement has been helpful in getting the foot to move like it used to. It’s become easier to walk more “normally” in other shoes as well.

I’m not saying I’ll give up my Skechers when I am 100%, they are still the most comfortable sneakers that I’ve ever worn.

In response to strongevity who said:
I do not have a PhD in Biomechanics or Exercise Physiology, but I have been around human kinetics for the better part of the last decade. The syndrome that this products treats is disconnected neuromuscular control. In other words: individuals are not controlling their muscles with their brains, so the level of development is marginal at best.

Take that ab belt that electrically shocked a person to a six-pack. The idea is that the belt does what your brain is supposed to–activate your abs. So, by circumventing the designated system (your body) and using an external effector (Shape Ups, Electric Ab Belt, etc.) you are sticking a band-aid on a tomahawk wound.

mooshu
Member
mooshu

I don’t wanna lose weight. I just wanna feel like I’m on top of the world. Is that OK?

In response to strongevity who said:
I do not have a PhD in Biomechanics or Exercise Physiology, but I have been around human kinetics for the better part of the last decade. The syndrome that this products treats is disconnected neuromuscular control. In other words: individuals are not controlling their muscles with their brains, so the level of development is marginal at best.

Take that ab belt that electrically shocked a person to a six-pack. The idea is that the belt does what your brain is supposed to–activate your abs. So, by circumventing the designated system (your body) and using an external effector (Shape Ups, Electric Ab Belt, etc.) you are sticking a band-aid on a tomahawk wound.

divetrash
Member
divetrash

I bought a pair of the Skechers Shape Ups a few weeks ago and I’ve been wearing them almost non stop. They are so comfortable. I am recovering from a car accident in which I shattered my left hip socket, I graduated to a cane back in November and the walking was getting slowly better. After reading a little about these shoes, I thought, well, if they really do work your leg and core muscles that’s got to be good for my hip. Particularly because of the round soles you walk in the correct heel-toe rol1 kind of way a bit less consciously and after months of limping, I need that correction.

I noticed a difference pretty quickly. Definitely, in posture, I have a crutch/cane slouch. They seem to be helping with my balance as well, so I’ve been able to walk a bit more normally, less like Frankenstein. My legs are tired after wearing them all day, but tired in that work out good way, but then, my legs muscles were used a lot less activity than usual over the past 9 months, so someone in better shape, might not notice it quite as much.

All in all, I’m pretty happy with mine if for no other reason than they are the most comfortable pair of sneakers that I have ever owned. But happily, I am also seeing a physical benefit from them.

ILoveHoboken
Member
ILoveHoboken

I would love a pair too. I do a lot of walking, and these shoes look soooo comfortable.

escaped68
Member

I go to the gym on a regular basis and I see quite a few people using these type of shoes. They look kind of radical to me.

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