Hobokenpix: Troubling Tressel

2/1/2010:

[Continuing the ORIGINAL Hoboken411 “Photo of the Day” series…]

Hoboken Photo of the Day – 2/1/2010

This incident happens a bit too often for my comfort. Considering these train tracks are so vital to the transportation of the NYC tri-state area, you’d think there’d be more safety measures in place. Imagine if an out of control speeding semi-driver just took a bunch of bridges out? It’d be mayhem here for weeks!

Truck stuck under railroad bridge in Jersey City Hoboken border NJ

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13 Comments on "Hobokenpix: Troubling Tressel"

NJDevils1087
Member
NJDevils1087

Clearly none of you are up on your tri-state transit trivia. Sure the truck won’t take the bridge down, but the truck’s CONTENTS are a different story:

“On March 26, 2004, a bridge on I-95 in Bridgeport, Connecticut was partly melted by the explosion of a tanker truck carrying over 11,900 gallons (45,000 L) of fuel oil. Repairs were estimated to take at least two weeks…”

That was the most obscure w/e no big deal bridge carrying I-95 (road only) over a 1 lane a way street on the outskirts of Bridgeport, not a bridge supporting 4 lanes of train traffic and a catenary grid connection section. It was also only partially melted. You can extrapolate the crisis potential from there.

homeworld
Member

Or the truck that destroyed the overpass in Denville on Rt. 80.

acrowusa.com/index.php?page=it-s-br...route-80-tie-ups-add-hours-to-trips

In response to NJDevils1087 who said:
Clearly none of you are up on your tri-state transit trivia. Sure the truck won’t take the bridge down, but the truck’s CONTENTS are a different story:

“On March 26, 2004, a bridge on I-95 in Bridgeport, Connecticut was partly melted by the explosion of a tanker truck carrying over 11,900 gallons (45,000 L) of fuel oil. Repairs were estimated to take at least two weeks…”

That was the most obscure w/e no big deal bridge carrying I-95 (road only) over a 1 lane a way street on the outskirts of Bridgeport, not a bridge supporting 4 lanes of train traffic and a catenary grid connection section. It was also only partially melted. You can extrapolate the crisis potential from there.

Easy-E
Member

I stand by my statement.

There’s no comparison to a concrete overpass on the parkway to this old, overbuilt steel and stone monstrosity. It’s made to support a lot more weight than anything you’re going to find on the parkway.

homeworld
Member

I wasn’t refuting you. I was pointing out that in truck vs bridge, the bridge wins.

In response to Easy-E who said:
I stand by my statement.

There’s no comparison to a concrete overpass on the parkway to this old, overbuilt steel and stone monstrosity. It’s made to support a lot more weight than anything you’re going to find on the parkway.

emarche
Member

http://www.break.com/index/truck-vs-bridge.html

In response to homeworld who said:
I wasn’t refuting you. I was pointing out that in truck vs bridge, the bridge wins.

Chase22
Member
Chase22

this use to happen weekly. It use to be, the first brigdes comming into hoboken … the streets were lowered so trucks could get up the back road to lackawanna whse. unfortunately, the next bridge was not. So, they sail into hoboken, make one bridge with the lowered street and smack into the next.

we use to call them roofers. opens like a can of tuna.

plywood
Member
plywood

NJT has people trained to track these exposures as part of their overhead.

mcspacebar
Member

No worries mate.
i used to work in Long Island City -Queens near the N train trestle. I saw countless semi’s have their roofs peeled like Bananas.
virtually no damage to the trestle.

wpDiscuz