Hobokenpix: HUMC ER

11/6/2009:

[Continuing the ORIGINAL Hoboken411 “Photo of the Day” series…]

Hoboken Photo of the Day – 11/6/2009

Thought this random photo of the Hoboken University Medical Center emergency room entrance snapped the other day came out pretty good.

And made me think – where does the Hospital go when IT is sick? A Real Estate Developer? City Hall coffers? Obama?

hoboken-university-medical-center-emergency-room-humc-nj

PS – if you have images collecting dust on your camera or hard drive – send them in for eventual inclusion on Hoboken411! Please state how you’d like to be credited in your email, and a description – if desired!!

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14 Comments on "Hobokenpix: HUMC ER"

jc5201
Member
jc5201

Looking past the bond issue & the lack of financial accountability for a second, how is it a good idea to have an emergency oriented hospital smack dab in the middle of thin, one-way streets?

realstuff
Member
realstuff

That’s a transportation question for Ian; however, the local response to the hospital has good recorded times…………the average response for the FD is under 4 mins. according to the fire chief. The real issue is how to get past the bond issue and the financial disaster to the taxpayer. Money the operational loss is the name of the game………….

In response to jc5201 who said:
Looking past the bond issue & the lack of financial accountability for a second, how is it a good idea to have an emergency oriented hospital smack dab in the middle of thin, one-way streets?

realstuff
Member
realstuff

By the way, we can thank Roberts for the Bond and the overspent budget that put us under state supervision with our current budget woes. Thank Bernie as well………..

inquisitivemind
Member
inquisitivemind
Hoboken is not alone with a financially failing hospital. The business model of NJ hospitals overall is broken. In my previous post I have outlined my dislike to the law mandating the ER treat any medical situation that walks through its doors. The law needs to be changed to prevent people from using the ER as their primary care MD. The ER should only be used for true emergencies. Makes sense, right? I also think if the uninsured can afford to buy coverage and does not chose to, their hospital debt for non-emergency visits to the ER should be sold into collections if they don’t pay the bill for the hospital’s services. Enough of the: privatize the profit, socialize the losses. That’s what people who can afford coverage and chose not to buy it do to the rest of us when using the services of the hospital when needed, not paying in full due to the likely high bill, thus leaving the rest of society to pay for it. I agree with poster # 3, mookie, that lowering $800k administrator salaries to $100k or less will help, but fixing the main problem requires state level changes. I hope Dawn Zimmer understands the huge challanges the hospital faces, the fact that most in NJ are non-profit and lose big $, and that Hoboken should NEVER be allocating municipal assets towards the bleeding balance sheet of the hospital. This issue should have been part of the campaign. When the hospital gets sick,… Read more »
realstuff
Member
realstuff
The business model for most cities is not to be responsible for a $52 mil. hospital bond. I fear the final look that the Nationa Health Care Plan will take; however, it may well keep hospitals open because they will now be paid by most citizens who currently do not have hospitalization. Of course we all will pay, but it will be spread out nationally. In response to inquisitivemind who said: Hoboken is not alone with a financially failing hospital. The business model of NJ hospitals overall is broken. In my previous post I have outlined my dislike to the law mandating the ER treat any medical situation that walks through its doors. The law needs to be changed to prevent people from using the ER as their primary care MD. The ER should only be used for true emergencies. Makes sense, right? I also think if the uninsured can afford to buy coverage and does not chose to, their hospital debt for non-emergency visits to the ER should be sold into collections if they don’t pay the bill for the hospital’s services. Enough of the: privatize the profit, socialize the losses. That’s what people who can afford coverage and chose not to buy it do to the rest of us when using the services of the hospital when needed, not paying in full due to the likely high bill, thus leaving the rest of society to pay for it. I agree with poster # 3, mookie, that lowering $800k… Read more »
matt_72
Member

Doubtful, the Pelosi bill initiates programs that will eventually cut reimbursement rates for hospitals in high cost areas like the NYC areas down to what hospitals in low cost areas get paid (see Secs. 1158-1160 (pp. 499-520)). So unless doctors & nurses in Hoboken slash their pay down to what their peers in Alabama make, HUMC will continue to burn cash. National healthcare may kill this and most hospitals in NJ if it becomes the defacto provider of heathcare. Then again, that is par for the course for large entitlement programs, they tend to offer nothing but large promises that are completely unaffordable over the long haul.

In response to realstuff who said:
The business model for most cities is not to be responsible for a $52 mil. hospital bond. I fear the final look that the Nationa Health Care Plan will take; however, it may well keep hospitals open because they will now be paid by most citizens who currently do not have hospitalization. Of course we all will pay, but it will be spread out nationally.

inquisitivemind
Member
inquisitivemind
Preface: my Dad is a higher up at one of the non-profit Saint Barnabas hospitals in Northern NJ. Saint Barnabas operates, many NJ hospitals and currently is not in good shape financially, defaulting on current debt, issuing new debt in the tripple B range. There are many reasons why. First and foremost is that they have to treat every patient that walks in the ER, medical emergency or not, as per federal law, regardless of the patient’s ability to pay. I personally believe this law needs to change. Hospitals should work with local urgent care centers, and direct non medical emergency situations there. As a result of people going to the ER uninsured for non-emergency care, the state of NJ currently reimburses NJ hospitals $0.25/$1 spent for services provided. This is insane. How is the hospital supposed to recoop the remaining 75% of the costs they incurred treating the patient? Hoboken has an urgent care center: Prompt MD Urgent Care (1st & Willow). I don’t know if the hospital has any relationship with them or what their policy is regarding uninsured patients unable to pay. The hospital would be in much better shape if the ER, which is the most expensive form of medical care, wasn’t being used as a primary care MD for the uninsured & unable to pay. The uninsured can’t walk into a regular GP without the ability to pay. The state of NJ, also broke, should reimburse the hospital for services provided more than $0.25/$1 spent.… Read more »
truth1
Member
truth1

The Hoboken taxpayer, citizens and local hospital employees are facing a massive disaster like hit. The hospital is operating at very high losses and the taxpayers have to back up the $52 mil. bond. If the hospital closes, we reduce our public health and cause local unemployment. Yes, we own the real estate, but we are in a value decline. Pros advise that additional devaluation of this property will be caused by costs as high as $10 mil. to demolish and for asbestos abatement. This hospital problem is in additions to our currect budget woes, SWAT team costs, pier collapse, Observer Highway garage sale mess and other city problems. Have a nice weekend!

Watchmaker
Member
Watchmaker

I’m going to go nuts here momentarily and agree with matt_72: we may be best served if the city files for bankruptcy, especially if we can persuade Beth Mason’s husband, a bankruptcy attorney, to represent the city for free.

Otherwise every “solution” at this point seems like a “disaster recovery” effort.

In response to truth1 who said:
The Hoboken taxpayer, citizens and local hospital employees are facing a massive disaster like hit. The hospital is operating at very high losses and the taxpayers have to back up the $52 mil. bond. If the hospital closes, we reduce our public health and cause local unemployment. Yes, we own the real estate, but we are in a value decline. Pros advise that additional devaluation of this property will be caused by costs as high as $10 mil. to demolish and for asbestos abatement. This hospital problem is in additions to our currect budget woes, SWAT team costs, pier collapse, Observer Highway garage sale mess and other city problems. Have a nice weekend!

truth1
Member
truth1

Can we file for bankruptcy while under State supervision? Just a question since the State Statute would have to be looked at by legal pros.

In response to Watchmaker who said:
I’m going to go nuts here momentarily and agree with matt_72: we may be best served if the city files for bankruptcy, especially if we can persuade Beth Mason’s husband, a bankruptcy attorney, to represent the city for free.

Otherwise every “solution” at this point seems like a “disaster recovery” effort.

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