Corzine’s economic recovery plan for NJ

10/17/2008:

Woke up this morning and found this press release that a Hoboken411 reader sent me…

Governor Corzine launches aggressive plan for NJ’s economic recovery

Governor Jon S. Corzine today addressed a rare joint session of the New Jersey Legislature to unveil a multi-faceted plan to provide immediate assistance for Garden State residents and statewide long-term economic growth options to coax the state out of the current national economic recession.

jon-corzine-new-jersey-economic-recovery-october-2008.jpg

“If ever there were a time for a comprehensive, non-partisan economic plan by New Jersey’s elected officials, it is in today’s circumstances,” Governor Corzine said. “The unprecedented and evolving financial crisis of the past several months has already significantly weakened America’s, and the state’s, economy. It undoubtedly will bring more severe challenges in the months ahead.”

READ THE REST AFTER THE JUMP…

(Corzine’s Economic Recovery Plan, continued…)

In his address, Governor Corzine specified four areas of attack: immediate assistance, including foreclosure prevention, energy costs, and food costs; short-term job creation, focusing on expediting public works projects and enabling community banks to loan funds to local businesses; long-term business climate changes, specifically on changes in tax policy and the cultivation of alternative energy projects, and; continued fiscal responsibility on the state level by keeping state spending in check.

“While this initiative cannot separate us from the interconnected world in which we live, it can help position New Jersey for a strong recovery,” Governor Corzine said.

In the immediate term, Governor Corzine’s plan will involve addressing the most critical needs of New Jersey families dealing with the current financial
crisis: foreclosure prevention, energy bills, and food purchase assistance. The plan will also rapidly advance planned infrastructure projects – including the rebuilding of urban and suburban schools, expansion of the Turnpike and Parkway, and construction of a new mass transit tunnel – creating an estimated 43,600 jobs.

In the long-term, Governor Corzine proposes substantial changes in New Jersey’s tax policy that will make the state more inviting to small business owners and relocating businesses, while aggressively cultivating the industries of the future to better position the state for years to come in the areas like: off- shore wind energy, solar energy, and projects focused on energy conservation and renewable resources.

Governor Corzine also said that state government will continue to cut costs and reduce spending to prepare for impending reductions in revenue. Previously, the Governor reduced state spending by almost $3 billion, reduced the overall size of government, and dedicated $650 million toward debt reduction.

“I believe we will emerge stronger, despite the doomsday scenarios being posited right now,” Governor Corzine said. “But it will take concerted and sustained effort of policymakers, employers, workers, family members, and neighbors. Our sense of community and our obligation to one another are of paramount importance at this time.

“The solutions to our financial crisis lie in pulling the right policy levers, but in a larger sense, they reside in our collective will, our empathy, and our commitment to real action that improves people’s lives.”

Leave a Reply

21 Comments on "Corzine’s economic recovery plan for NJ"

truth1
Member
truth1

Yes, public tranportation in small energy efficient vehicles. The savings in eliminating most of Hoboken’s current large vehicle fleet and supervising the use of same on and off duty may be able to provide for public transportation at a reasonable cost to visitors, residents and taxpayers. By the way, the cost for gasoline and diesel fuel last year was approximately $400.000 for a mile square city. Wait until the State monitor visits this scene ❗ And, Mayor Roberts is comparing himself to Mayor Bloomberg :mrgreen:

Reformerus_Gianticus
Member
Reformerus_Gianticus

[quote comment=”112554″][quote comment=”112532″]

the irony in this statement is that building more roads doesn’t decrease traffic. in the short term it does, but then we’ll be saying this all over again when 5 lanes on each side isn’t enough. but i guess there’s not much else we can do.[/quote]

Actually, if the politicians just practiced some restraint w/ respect to zoning, I’d be right. But as they don’t, you are probably right.[/quote]

not sure what you mean about zoning, but this has just always been a simple truth. If Hoboken built more parking garages or created more parking spaces, it’s not like the town would miraculously have more parking that is easily accessible – more people would put cars here. if you built more roads into hoboken – it would be easier to get in and out for a while – until cars filled those roads. it’s a classic infrastructure problem. many european cities have just stopped and are focusing on bike transportation or public transportation.

it was always the kicker in sim city. you thought you needed to build more roads to alleviate traffic, but traffic would get worse! so frustrating. then, when you’d start adding mass transit and making the roads simple, traffic disappeared! video games explain it all![/quote]

Maybe some of Hobokens City Planners should pay Sim City. They might just learn a thing or two about urban planning.

bradykp
Member
bradykp

[quote comment=”112532″]

the irony in this statement is that building more roads doesn’t decrease traffic. in the short term it does, but then we’ll be saying this all over again when 5 lanes on each side isn’t enough. but i guess there’s not much else we can do.[/quote]

Actually, if the politicians just practiced some restraint w/ respect to zoning, I’d be right. But as they don’t, you are probably right.[/quote]

not sure what you mean about zoning, but this has just always been a simple truth. If Hoboken built more parking garages or created more parking spaces, it’s not like the town would miraculously have more parking that is easily accessible – more people would put cars here. if you built more roads into hoboken – it would be easier to get in and out for a while – until cars filled those roads. it’s a classic infrastructure problem. many european cities have just stopped and are focusing on bike transportation or public transportation.

it was always the kicker in sim city. you thought you needed to build more roads to alleviate traffic, but traffic would get worse! so frustrating. then, when you’d start adding mass transit and making the roads simple, traffic disappeared! video games explain it all!

matt_72
Member

[quote comment=”112523″][quote comment=”112374″][quote comment=”112348″]Why do we have to expand the Turnpike and Parkway you ask? Because of the millions and millions of people we have imported who absolutely must perform the jobs that Americans won’t do. I wonder if “highway expanding” might become one of those jobs soon as well. Am I just making this up? Well, why don’t we just go over to the Regional Plan Association’s website (rpa.org) and have a look for ourselves. Here are their population increase estimates:

-AMERICA WILL GROW IN POPULATION BY ROUGHLY 40% BY THE YEAR 2050 TO REACH A TOTAL POPULATION OF 430 MILLION. (This has recently been revised up to 440 million.)

-New Jersey will increase in population by 1.3 million by 2030.

But I know, I know, we just can’t talk about that. You just can’t. Someone’s feelings might get hurt….[/quote]

We have to expand the turnpike to get rid of the frigging traffic jams that seem to get worse each year.[/quote]

the irony in this statement is that building more roads doesn’t decrease traffic. in the short term it does, but then we’ll be saying this all over again when 5 lanes on each side isn’t enough. but i guess there’s not much else we can do.[/quote]

Actually, if the politicians just practiced some restraint w/ respect to zoning, I’d be right. But as they don’t, you are probably right.

bradykp
Member
bradykp

[quote comment=”112481″]http://www.america2050.org/northeast/

First sentence: “With a current population of 50 million, the Northeast Megaregion is expected to welcome another 18 million residents by the year 2050.”

This will have an (obviously) major impact on our quality of life. Is this really in the best interest of American citizens? Are we really going to be better off with almost 20 million more people in the Northeast? Who on Earth thinks this is a good idea! How are we going to build the infrastructure to meet the resulting demands? I feel like I’m taking crazy pills![/quote]

it’s because this is the center of the universe! i wish they would develop some other cities and spread the population out more over this gigantic country. oh well. i like it here though.

wpDiscuz