Say NO to in-app purchases

In-app purchases are the work of the devil

in-app purchaseEveryone and their brother has a smartphone these days. Along with all the woes that come along with owning, let alone using a smartphone, is the incessant “need” to use it to fill a majority of your time every day. And that leads us to “apps” and the sick phenomenon called “in-app purchases.”

In-app purchases are “features” tied to any particular application that you download and install on your device (phone, tablet, even full-fledged desktop or laptop computer).

The applications are either free or paid.

The In-app purchase model can be considered a “brilliant” psychological framework to some. One, it breaks down the “cost of entry” barrier (with either a very low price-point, or entirely free), and two – it often reaps the application developer a windfall way beyond what they could expect if they charged for the program upfront.

So why is this bad?

Preying on human psychological weakness

in-app purchase coinsGames are in my opinion the worst offenders of the bunch. I think they prey on kids the most, as well as the weak parents who allow their children to rack up major bills each month (and that’s beyond even allowing them to use such soul-sucking devices, but I digress).

Most games out there use the tried and true “gamification” model. Hook you into a fun game, incorporate “levels” in which you can progress on, and then get you just close enough to reach your next level – but you NEED SOMETHING ELSE to proceed.

These games will either make you wait a day or so to “recharge,” or if you really want to continue playing NOW – you have to buy stupid things like “gems” or “coins” to have the privilege of continuing.

There are so many people addicted to such games, that they would much rather PAY than WAIT to play.

Some games are designed fairly. You can effectively play the game fully (albeit with waiting) while offering the impatient suckers a way to pay for their character flaw. Fine.

Other games are horrible. They essentially cripple the program to the point where you have almost no chance to proceed unless you pay. Otherwise, you’re left with a shitty program.

I’d suggest NEVER PAYING to play a free game with in-app purchases.

In an ideal world: All apps free for 30 days

I know, I know – who is going to pay these developers for their work?

Fair enough. If someone creates something – and you find value in it – you should probably compensate them if you want it.

However, the “in-app purchases” model is more deceitful than it is straight-forward. And can often leave people feeling dismayed about what they got themselves into.

If developers want to be paid for their work – I think we should go back to the “30-day trial” method.

Where all applications are “Free to Try” for 30 days. That means a fully-functional program that you can kick the tires on – and at the end of 30 days, the program locks. You can either pay to get the program back (which is then yours to keep forever), or just delete it if you do not think it was worth the money to own.

Then again, maybe all of this is fine. Because intelligent people already understand what I’m talking about (and don’t fall victim), and the idiots will get what’s coming to them as they pay for shit they could easily do without.

say no to in-app purchases

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