Sandy Scamming {Nikola Lulaj}

Hoboken Police Officer Nikola Lulaj charged with scamming “Sandy money…”

Hoboken Police Officer Nikola Lulaj was charged with some allegedly fraudulent actions regarding Hurricane Sandy funding. See below.

This is why the government should NEVER get involved with people who live in known areas of risk. If you live near a massive body of water, you ought to be prepared – not rely on handouts (redistribution of wealth), etc. Only complicates crap across the board.

Maybe the forms were confusing, or overwhelming for people to fully understand. Who knows. I hate forms too.

Nikola Lulaj Hoboken cop Hurricane Sandy allegations

Nikola Lulaj, 42, of Seaside Heights, N.J., (formerly of Dumont, N.J.), allegedly filed fraudulent applications following Superstorm Sandy for FEMA assistance, a low-interest SBA disaster-relief loan, and state grants under the Homeowner Resettlement Program (RSP), the Reconstruction, Rehabilitation, Elevation and Mitigation (RREM) Program, and the Sandy Homeowner and Renter Assistance Program (SHRAP) funded by the New Jersey Department of Human Services. As a result, he received a total of approximately $187,074 in relief funds. It is alleged that Lulaj falsely claimed in his applications that a home he owns on Webster Avenue in Seaside Heights which was damaged by Superstorm Sandy was his primary residence at the time Sandy struck. In fact, his primary residence was in Dumont, N.J. Lulaj has since moved to the house in Seaside Heights, but at the time of the storm, it allegedly was a vacation/rental property. As a result of the alleged fraudulent applications, he received $2,820 from FEMA, $90,200 in SBA loan proceeds, a $69,054 RREM grant, a $10,000 RSP grant, and a $15,000 SHRAP grant. Lulaj is charged with second-degree theft by deception and fourth-degree unsworn falsification.

“Acting Attorney General Robert Lougy announced that five additional individuals were charged criminally today with filing fraudulent applications for federal relief funds related to Superstorm Sandy. Since March 2014, the Attorney General’s Office has filed criminal charges against 62 people for allegedly engaging in this type of fraud, including the five individuals charged today.

The Attorney General’s Office is continuing its aggressive efforts to investigate fraud in Sandy relief programs, working jointly with the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs (DCA) and the Offices of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

The individuals who have been charged are alleged, in most cases, to have filed fraudulent applications for relief funds offered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). In many cases, they also applied for funds from a Sandy relief program funded by HUD, low-interest disaster loans from the SBA, or assistance provided by the New Jersey Department of Human Services. The HUD funds are administered in New Jersey by the Department of Community Affairs.

“Each of these defendants knew the requirements to qualify for this disaster aid, but each selfishly lied about their circumstances to steal funding intended for those hardest hit by Sandy, namely homeowners who were left homeless and displaced renters forced to pay for new leases,” said Acting Attorney General Lougy. “It’s a sad truth that even in the direst of emergencies, when so many generous people step forward to lend a hand, there are others who will dishonestly exploit an offer of assistance.”

See the rest of the people charged below.

  • Rachel Bryant, 53, of Philadelphia, Pa., allegedly fraudulently obtained a total of $23,918 by filing false applications following Superstorm Sandy for FEMA assistance and state grant funds under the Sandy Homeowner and Renter Assistance Program (SHRAP) funded by the New Jersey Department of Human Services. Bryant allegedly falsely claimed in the applications that a storm-damaged property that she and her mother owned on McKinley Avenue in Atlantic City was her primary residence at the time Sandy hit. It is alleged that, in fact, Bryant was living in another residence at the time of the storm. Bryant received $14,911 for property damage and $2,346 for rental assistance from FEMA, and she received $6,661 in SHRAP grant funds to replace various appliances and personal items. Bryant is charged with third-degree theft by deception and fourth-degree unsworn falsification.
  • Gordon Sinclair, 40, of Summit, N.J., allegedly fraudulently obtained a total of $12,270 by filing false applications following Superstorm Sandy for FEMA rental assistance and a state grant under the Homeowner Resettlement Program (RSP). It is alleged that Sinclair falsely claimed in his applications that a storm-damaged property that he owned on Moonrise Lane in Lavallette, N.J., was his primary residence at the time Sandy hit. It is alleged that, in reality, his primary residence was an apartment in Hoboken and the property in Lavallette was a vacation home. Sinclair received a $10,000 RSP grant and $2,270 in FEMA rental assistance. Sinclair is charged with third-degree theft by deception and fourth-degree unsworn falsification.
  • Pat G. Angelastro, 46, of Ortley Beach, N.J., allegedly fraudulently obtained a total of $10,000 by filing a false application following Superstorm Sandy for a state grant under the Homeowner Resettlement Program (RSP). It is alleged that Angelastro falsely claimed in the application that at the time Sandy struck, he owned a house on Fielder Avenue in Ortley Beach that was damaged by the storm. It is alleged that, while the storm-damaged house was Angelastro’s primary residence, he did not own it. His parents owned the house at the time of the storm. Angelastro therefore was not qualified for the grant monies. He received a $10,000 RSP grant as a result of the alleged false application. Angelastro also applied for a state grant under the Reconstruction, Rehabilitation, Elevation and Mitigation (RREM) Program, but that application was denied. He is charged with third-degree theft by deception.
  • Catherine Alvira-Przybylski, 45, of Keyport, N.J., allegedly fraudulently obtained $9,775 in FEMA rental assistance by submitting fraudulent documents indicating that she incurred rental expenses after Superstorm Sandy that she never incurred. At the time Superstorm Sandy struck, Alvira-Przybylski lived in an apartment in Seaside Heights, N.J., that was damaged by the storm, forcing her to relocate. While she legitimately received certain assistance from FEMA, it is alleged that she fraudulently received additional FEMA rental assistance totaling $9,775 by submitting false receipts indicating she herself paid rent and security deposits at times when, in fact, her housing expenses were paid with government or charitable relief funds, or were not paid at all. She allegedly submitted false receipts totaling $2,550 for her purported payment of a security deposit and one month’s rent for an apartment in Keyport, at a time when FEMA was paying for her to be sheltered in a hotel in Hazlet. She also allegedly submitted false receipts totaling $5,625 indicating that she paid a security deposit and three months’ rent for another apartment in Keyport, when those expenses were, in fact, paid by the American Red Cross, or another charitable organization, or, for one month, not paid at all. In addition, she allegedly submitted false receipts indicating that she paid four months’ rent totaling $1,600 for her son to live with a family friend so he could remain in the school he had been attending. In fact, the son allegedly was living with his father, Alvira-Przybylski’s former husband. Alvira-Przybylski is charged with third-degree theft by deception and fourt

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3 Comments on "Sandy Scamming {Nikola Lulaj}"

trello
Member
trello

“Each of these defendants knew the requirements to qualify for this disaster aid, but each selfishly lied about their circumstances to steal funding intended for those hardest hit by Sandy, namely homeowners who were left homeless and displaced renters forced to pay for new leases,”

How do they know they knowingly lied? Not everyone is in tune with what stringent requirements apply. Same can be said for those that approved the grants or loans. Why didn’t they have better controls in place to prevent this apparent fraud.

john14
Member
john14

I don’t understand. It was his home and got damaged by Sandy. Why does it matter if it was a vacation home or not? Why would people with more than one home (maybe because they saved money) be denied funds that were meant for everyone affected by the storm?

rocklobster
Member
rocklobster

It’s common knowledge that FEMA grants cannot be used for vacation homes. Why should taxpayers pay to fix someone’s vacation home? If it’s a vacation home then they have a primary residence so they won’t be left homeless. People with vacation homes are supposed to have insurance to pay for storm damage repairs.

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