Church Square Park: Again!

5/6/2008:

A Hoboken411 reader chimes in about one of the upcoming resolutions on this weeks council agenda (more on the rest later):

CSP in the news again

“For those who are not aware, at the most recent council meeting, local resident Matt Lasorda submitted a suggestion for a resolution to immediately move the newly planted trees in Church Square Park which are to the north of the dog run and “return” the space to “field” space. Apparently, this suggested resolution made it’s way onto the May 7th council agenda:

14.* Calling for the return of recreation space in a portion of Church Square Square

Hoboken Church Square Park Trees

It is alarming that any member, or members, of the council would continue to foster a community divide over this square block of park space. Instead of trying to create consensus within the community – the council is fanning the divisive flame. According to Councilman Peter Cunningham, in the near term, there will be an introduction of an ordinance to require public notice of any changes to existing parks and public hearings. Unfortunately, it appears that the ordinance will not require public consensus.

It is suggested that members of the public who are disturbed by the behavior of our elected council persons for any of the following reasons:

  • Adding a resolution on the agenda to make any more changes to public parks without any sort of consensus process
  • Allowing select members of the public to attend and participate in private meeting at which public parks and spaces are discussed
  • Attempting to make any and all open space issues a referendum on children
  • Disrespecting and citizen attempts to create a process of consensus

What are your opinions about this sliver of open space at Church Square Park? Trees or no trees?

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71 Comments on "Church Square Park: Again!"


Journey
Member
Journey
8 years 4 months ago

[quote comment=”82257″]What is lost in all this talk is that parents should teach children they can not and should not get everything they ask for or expect. That is where the danger comes in creating an entitled monster when he or she grows up.[/quote]

I fear, the parents that raise their kids to want everything, and never say no to them, had parents that did the same. They themselves are entitled monsters, their offspring should be entitled (or so they think).

Journey
Member
Journey
8 years 4 months ago

[quote comment=”82211″]Sorry dont get me wrong I am not saying to tell kids they suck, or they will never amount to anything. that kind of verbal abuse will screw a kid up worse than most things.

What you are saying is right, teach kids to embrace there strengths and weakneses. If your not good in sports fine, do somethimng else. Or play them but realize your not Pro ball material.

But these parents who are so afraid to ever say anything negative or accept their kids limitations by letting the kids and themselves believe they are great at anything and everything because “we are all winners and equal” is BS.

Need to teach kids how to lose and how to accept failure. It happens,like you said even winners lose sometimes.[/quote]

I get your point; love, compassion, criticism, pride, “your my special kid” – all have to be tempered with a healthy does of reality.

Journey
Member
Journey
8 years 4 months ago

[quote comment=”82222″]heh. I’d venture to guess high-achievers actually “lose” more than low-achievers because they are always pushing for greater achievements. You have to get it wrong to be able to figure out how to get it right for many things. I agree with the posters above about though about the need to be honest but also have compassion. Something my fourth grade math teacher in the “gifted” kids program didn’t have when she called me stupid in front of the entire class. No, not “that is stupid” but I was. The shame is still burned in my head 25 years later, and I don’t remember what I did to get that reaction. One of those people in life that would be fun to bump into now to show how wrong they were.[/quote]

For me it was the 5th grade teacher’s Mountain of spelling scores. One construction paper mountain on the bulletin board with a little mountain climber to represent each student and their grade on the spelling test.

Everyone teased me for the low spelling grade I got. I studied hard and my score didn’t go up. I cheated and my score didn’t go up. Skip ahead 5 years, when I was diagnosed with dysgraphia. It is next to impossible for me to spell anything right. The only thing that helps is spell checkers.

moproteus
Member
moproteus
8 years 4 months ago

What is lost in all this talk is that parents should teach children they can not and should not get everything they ask for or expect. That is where the danger comes in creating an entitled monster when he or she grows up.

a_siren
Member
8 years 4 months ago

heh. I’d venture to guess high-achievers actually “lose” more than low-achievers because they are always pushing for greater achievements. You have to get it wrong to be able to figure out how to get it right for many things. I agree with the posters above about though about the need to be honest but also have compassion. Something my fourth grade math teacher in the “gifted” kids program didn’t have when she called me stupid in front of the entire class. No, not “that is stupid” but I was. The shame is still burned in my head 25 years later, and I don’t remember what I did to get that reaction. One of those people in life that would be fun to bump into now to show how wrong they were.

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