Billion Dollar Bully {update}

How does Yelp survive?

Here’s how pretty much every business feels about this racket called “Yelp”:

And here’s one chef bitching and moaning about how frustrating it is to deal with this stupid digital way of living life:

No-brain apps offer a psychological advantage

Everyone now begs for “easy.” Phone apps have layers of “hooks” to keep users engaged (ratings, badges, other useless crap). Which in turn creates an “addiction” most people do not realize they even have.

No one is willing (or even completely UNABLE) to use their brain the old-fashioned way anymore.

How does it end?

The perfect scenario is that all businesses collectively just say “no” to paying Yelp for advertising.

And it would help tremendously if people stopped using this “Walmart” of business reviews and went back to the old ways of gauging whether a business is worth patronizing, such as:

  • experimenting, trying it themselves
  • keen awareness of environment, mood, surroundings
  • word of mouth, friends

But because the new normal is using the digital “tools” available, the collective is being carted into uncharted territory with no desire to jump off and forge their own path. They just can’t do it.

Is Yelp really a “Billion Dollar Bully?”


Based on our casual conversations with many Hoboken businesses (who have not joined the cult), Yelp is definitely a “Billion Dollar Bully.”

As you can see from this trailer for a documentary in production – this sentiment may very well be true for tens of thousands of other local businesses across the country who’ve had their run-ins with this online review company.

Commentary: Yelp is for the unadventurous!

Yelp is one of the many reasons “apps” have seriously dumbed-down society as a whole.

Yelp Billion Dollar BullyNo longer are people reliant upon their own judgment when it comes to the worthiness of a business establishment. Before even giving anything a chance, they rush to “read reviews” that people they don’t know leave online. They don’t know the general rule that 9 out of 10 people “shout” when receiving bad service, and only 1 out of 10 share good news about exemplary service. That alone should make you take all online reviews with a pound of salt.

And adding salt to the wound, is Yelp’s shady practice of conveniently holding good reviews “hostage” until these lowly businesses pony up a monthly extortion charge.

Additionally – quality of “service” is often misunderstood – and one dopey waiter or waitress can hurt an establishment when the reviews are written by overly-demanding customers.

We’ve looked at Yelp years ago – and determined that we’d never use it again. Instead, use our own gut-instincts when choosing what restaurants or businesses to patronize. Yeah, it’s actually considered revolutionary these days!

You can tell when a place may not be up to par without the internet or an app. But tell that to those connected at the hip to their cell phones, and you might witness a nervous breakdown.

After watching the trailer – does that make you more or less likely to use these brain-cell destroying apps in the future?

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3 Comments on "Billion Dollar Bully {update}"

1 year 2 months ago

Yelp stock is tanking, so be on the lookout for more strong-arm bullying soon!

Hoboken Internet Radio
Hoboken Internet Radio
1 year 3 months ago

I think Yelp needs a whooping. How many Hoboken restaurants use Yelp? How many are frustrated by the mob mentality of this incredibly poor excuse for an app? How many Restaurants would be willing to JUST SAY NO to Yelp! Get enough Restaurants to stop using it and speak out against it and Hoboken eatery’s will make a statement that will bring in a load of positive PR money cannot buy! Any Takers!?

CW McCall
CW McCall
1 year 3 months ago

Short answer: YES.

My roommate co-owns a restaurant in the West Village. If you or I log in to see reviews posted on Yelp, we see a pretty decent 4 ish star rating. When he logs into the restaurant account, he sees “pending” reviews. They are almost exclusively 4 and 5 star reviews of his business. Yelp has told him that if he pays, they will be able to “more accurately” provide reviews of his business. It’s an outrageous racket that even Boss Tweed could be proud of.