Hoboken Auto Deals from Empire: August 2014

Empire Auto Deals in Hoboken for August 2014:

Empire Auto Leasing & Sales, located at 101 Park Ave., is Hoboken’s only new car sales and leasing office. Below is a sample of some of the deals they’re offering this month – which are always better than you’d get at a dealer.

Empire Auto monthly car deals Hoboken NJ August 2014

2015 Audi A3

  • Term: 36 months with 10,000 miles per year (other mileage and car options available) leased through Audi Financial.
  • Price: $339 per month NO MONEY DOWN.
  • Total due at signing: First month payment, Audi Acquisition Fee, DMV & Dealer Doc Fees and your local taxes.

Audi A3 Lease Hoboken NJ 339 monthly Empire Auto

2014 Mercedes Benz E350

  • Term: 27 months with 12,000 miles per year (other mileage and car options available) leased through Mercedes Benz Financial Services.
  • Price: $559 per month NO MONEY DOWN.
  • Total due at signing: First month payment, Mercedes Acquisition Fee, DMV & Dealer Doc Fees and your local taxes.

Mercedes E350 Lease Hoboken NJ 559 monthly Empire Auto

Call (201)434-2277 for more information and check Empire’s Facebook Page for updated specials throughout the month.

7 Responses

  1. Craig-D says:

    Empire Auto Leasing is a good solution for those who don’t know what they are doing and/or are too lazy to properly negotiate for a vehicle. So if you are the sort of sucker that walks into a dealer and leases a car without negotiating, then yes, Empire’s price will always be better than you’d get at a dealer. However, it’s incorrect to say Empire will always beat a dealer’s price. Allow me to explain:

    I walked into Empire not too long ago and got a quote on the exact model I wanted. Oddly, there was no negotiation – they knew up front what it would cost without calling a dealer. I then went and spoke to 10 different dealers. After making them all compete against each other for my business in a bidding process, 2 of them beat Empire’s quote by $40 a month. I took delivery from the dealer, and for $40 less per month the car I got actually had more options than the one Empire quoted for me – making it an even better deal. I also got free wheel locks thrown in. It’s a little known fact that advertised leases are based on MSRP – and you’d be an idiot to pay it. You should always negotiate a car’s entire sales price on a lease just like if you were buying it. You never negotiate the monthly payment. I calculated Empire’s quote to be based on a sales price a bit more than $1000 over invoice, while my lease was based on invoice pricing (what the dealer pays for the car from the manufacturer). The dealer still makes money when they do this, but that’s another conversation. You’re never going to get the best possible deal at a leasing company because the dealer has to pay them, and that’s money that could have come off the sales price. It’s another mouth to feed.

    Empire does not negotiate with dealers for its customers. It’s pricing is based on a pre-arranged markup they have with dealers it works with, of which they get a pre-arranged fee for bringing the dealer the business. You can almost always do better on your own by negotiating and cutting out the middle man. But if you don’t want to contact multiple dealers and don’t want to haggle with car salesmen, then yes, Empire is the way to go. They’ll definitely get you better monthly payment than a lease based on MSRP.

    • empireauto says:

      Craig D, I’m pretty sure I remember you. You came in asking about an Audi Q5. When you came in, you were not ready to lease a car for a few months. I gave you lease numbers on the Audi Q5, don’t remember what they were. I explained to you that lease programs change every month, so the numbers that I give you may or may not change in the coming months. You did not ask me the MSRP of the car I quoted you, nor did you ask me the selling price for the car I quoted you. And you did not ask for a list of options in the car that I quoted you. You did not even come back to me to see if I could do better, since you said you had the 10 dealerships compete against each other and me. And, when I called you to follow up, you said you had gotten the car. That was the following month and prices may have changed.

      I don’t operate like a car dealership where you have to negotiate the price. I provide a concierge auto service for busy people who don’t have the time or don’t like to deal with car dealership shenanigans. I have been in business for over 9 years with thousands of satisfied customers. Obviously you like the game and or have too much free time to spend going to 10 dealerships. I worked in a dealership for 4 years, so I know how they operate. There is no way the dealer would have beat my numbers for $40 per month. You also fail to mention how much money you had to pay at signing. You most likely put down more money to lower the lease payment. Let’s make sure we are comparing apples to apples here. You say you got more options than the car I quoted plus wheel locks. Craig D, you don’t even know the options in the car I had quoted you since you didn’t ask. Next time ask me.

      Advertised lease payments are not based on MSRP. Residuals are based off of MSRP. I don’t’ quote lease and or sale prices at MSRP. The selling price of a car is completely different. Advertised lease prices, most of the time, are advertised with money down. That is paying extra cash out of your pocket to lower the lease payment. I can get you the same or better lease payment without the extra money out of pocket. If you paid extra money down, you were taken my friend. I quoted you without, as it is called in the car business, no money down.

      My lease prices are not based on a “pre-arranged markup” as you put it. I give the best possible lease payment and if I can do better I do. You asked me for a price and I gave you a price. I am not going to ask the dealer to do better if my customer isn’t ready.

      You don’t know how the dealership pays me so to say that you aren’t going to get the best deal from a leasing company is completely not true. Again, I have been in business for over 9 years so I must be doing something right. Car dealerships need to meet monthly sales goals; they provide me with wholesale pricing that I can pass along to my customers. In order for dealerships to hit their monthly numbers, they give me pricing that is a loss to them in order to move volume to hit their numbers to get paid extra money from the manufacturer.

      To my future customers, if you want to save time and money, and not spend countless days and hours haggling prices at a car dealership like Craig D, please contact me. I am sure that your time is worth more than traveling many miles and hours to car dealerships to possibly save money. I am sure you will be very happy that you did. Remember time is money and money is time.
      [quote comment=”223522″]Empire Auto Leasing is a good solution for those who don’t know what they are doing and/or are too lazy to properly negotiate for a vehicle. So if you are the sort of sucker that walks into a dealer and leases a car without negotiating, then yes, Empire’s price will always be better than you’d get at a dealer. However, it’s incorrect to say Empire will always beat a dealer’s price. Allow me to explain:I walked into Empire not too long ago and got a quote on the exact model I wanted. Oddly, there was no negotiation – they knew up front what it would cost without calling a dealer. I then went and spoke to 10 different dealers. After making them all compete against each other for my business in a bidding process, 2 of them beat Empire’s quote by $40 a month. I took delivery from the dealer, and for $40 less per month the car I got actually had more options than the one Empire quoted for me – making it an even better deal. I also got free wheel locks thrown in. It’s a little known fact that advertised leases are based on MSRP – and you’d be an idiot to pay it. You should always negotiate a car’s entire sales price on a lease just like if you were buying it. You never negotiate the monthly payment. I calculated Empire’s quote to be based on a sales price a bit more than $1000 over invoice, while my lease was based on invoice pricing (what the dealer pays for the car from the manufacturer). The dealer still makes money when they do this, but that’s another conversation. You’re never going to get the best possible deal at a leasing company because the dealer has to pay them, and that’s money that could have come off the sales price. It’s another mouth to feed.Empire does not negotiate with dealers for its customers. It’s pricing is based on a pre-arranged markup they have with dealers it works with, of which they get a pre-arranged fee for bringing the dealer the business. You can almost always do better on your own by negotiating and cutting out the middle man. But if you don’t want to contact multiple dealers and don’t want to haggle with car salesmen, then yes, Empire is the way to go. They’ll definitely get you better monthly payment than a lease based on MSRP.[/quote]

  2. Craig-D says:

    I didn’t want to get in a back and forth here, but I do want to set the record straight on a few assumptions. One, Empire and I did spec out the exact car I wanted with options down to the paint color – I wrote everything down to remember it. Empire’s quote on the exact car was $600/per mo. with no money down but typical up front fees and taxes. I did the calculations to see what selling price led to that lease payment at the then money factor buy rate and residual, and it came to a bit more than $1000 over invoice – which is not bad at all for that particular hot-selling car. When it came time to make the deal, that exact car wasn’t available, so I had to take one with an additional $1000 in options. I got it for $560/per mo – and no, I didn’t put money down other than the typical upfront fees and taxes. It would be unwise for anyone to put money down on a lease.

    Two, the only terms on the lease that changed in the interim was that the 36 mo. residual dropped a point (from 57% to 56%) – which actually makes a lease more pricey. The buy rate money factor also dropped a very slight bit (from .00130 to .00126), so it was basically a wash. Neither changes the fact that I got the lease based on a lower sales price – dealer invoice.

    Third, I didn’t visit 10 dealerships. I visited two stores in the process – Empire and the dealership I took delivery from. All other dealing was done via email or the phone. There was no back and forth. Everyone I dealt with had one chance to make their best offer and the best one got my business, simple as that. The winning bid this time won’t be the winner next time, depending on where each is on hitting their incentives – that’s how the business really works.

    Lastly, as for the comment that dealers offer Empire wholesale pricing at a loss, that’s not how the business works, as I once worked in sales at a dealership. Any dealer offering invoice pricing or even below invoice pricing is not selling at a loss. Invoice price is not really what dealerships pay for a vehicle anymore. Right now the typical markup from invoice to MSRP is about 6%. 20 years ago, it was closer to 12%. That extra margin didn’t disappear, it was hidden from the consumer in the internet age in which invoice became available to the consumer. It’s now in hidden in back-end incentives from manufacturer to dealer for hitting sales and consumer satisfaction goals.

    My intent here was not to bash Empire – if my first comment came across that way, I apologize. I only wanted to offer a little transparency in the auto business to the consumer. As a said before, Empire offers a great service for those who don’t want to do the legwork themselves. They will indeed offer the best deal for those who just want to sign and drive. But for those of us who know how the business works and don’t mind doing the legwork, there is extra money to be saved and that’s a fact.

    • empireauto says:

      Let me set the record straight since you did come across as bashing my business. You did not give me exact options on the car. Yes you did give me paint color and said you wanted premium plus with navigation, and that pretty much was about it. The car I had priced you had more options than that. German car builds are not cookie cutter like Japanese cars where for the most part everything is included in a certain trim level. With German marks, options are a la carte, so most cars will not be built the same. From what you say that the residual became worse and you received a car with more options at a lower price does not make any sense at all. The small change in money factor would not offset a 1 point residual change.

      You did state that you went and spoke to 10 different dealerships and had them compete against each other. Your typewritten words, not mine.

      And yes, I do get pricing on various car brands at a loss. You are incorrect. I get pricing way way below invoice, more than you can ever get. Dealers go way beyond holdback in many cases to move cars in an effort to hit their monthly sales goals. So yes, they are giving me pricing at a loss.

      That is all I have to say.[quote comment=”223535″]I didn’t want to get in a back and forth here, but I do want to set the record straight on a few assumptions. One, Empire and I did spec out the exact car I wanted with options down to the paint color – I wrote everything down to remember it. Empire’s quote on the exact car was $600/per mo. with no money down but typical up front fees and taxes. I did the calculations to see what selling price led to that lease payment at the then money factor buy rate and residual, and it came to a bit more than $1000 over invoice – which is not bad at all for that particular hot-selling car. When it came time to make the deal, that exact car wasn’t available, so I had to take one with an additional $1000 in options. I got it for $560/per mo – and no, I didn’t put money down other than the typical upfront fees and taxes. It would be unwise for anyone to put money down on a lease.Two, the only terms on the lease that changed in the interim was that the 36 mo. residual dropped a point (from 57% to 56%) – which actually makes a lease more pricey. The buy rate money factor also dropped a very slight bit (from .00130 to .00126), so it was basically a wash. Neither changes the fact that I got the lease based on a lower sales price – dealer invoice.Third, I didn’t visit 10 dealerships. I visited two stores in the process – Empire and the dealership I took delivery from. All other dealing was done via email or the phone. There was no back and forth. Everyone I dealt with had one chance to make their best offer and the best one got my business, simple as that. The winning bid this time won’t be the winner next time, depending on where each is on hitting their incentives – that’s how the business really works.Lastly, as for the comment that dealers offer Empire wholesale pricing at a loss, that’s not how the business works, as I once worked in sales at a dealership. Any dealer offering invoice pricing or even below invoice pricing is not selling at a loss. Invoice price is not really what dealerships pay for a vehicle anymore. Right now the typical markup from invoice to MSRP is about 6%. 20 years ago, it was closer to 12%. That extra margin didn’t disappear, it was hidden from the consumer in the internet age in which invoice became available to the consumer. It’s now in hidden in back-end incentives from manufacturer to dealer for hitting sales and consumer satisfaction goals.My intent here was not to bash Empire – if my first comment came across that way, I apologize. I only wanted to offer a little transparency in the auto business to the consumer. As a said before, Empire offers a great service for those who don’t want to do the legwork themselves. They will indeed offer the best deal for those who just want to sign and drive. But for those of us who know how the business works and don’t mind doing the legwork, there is extra money to be saved and that’s a fact.[/quote]

      • Craig-D says:

        Well, we can go back and forth on this all day, but I’ll leave it at this and them I’m done here: the bottom line is I told you the monthly price I wanted to pay needed to begin with a “5” and you said it couldn’t be done for what I wanted. Well, I got it done – and I didn’t put money down to do it as you suggested. You’re right that the slightly lower money factor wouldn’t completely offset the 1% drop in residual. But that is not helpful to your argument, because the formerly higher residual should have made the earlier lease terms even cheaper. And I am well aware of how various car makers option their vehicles. I was in the business too, this isn’t my first rodeo. I asked about a specific vehicle spec for comparison purposes – I didn’t expect to ever get the exact configuration.

        I stated I next went (as in moved on to) and spoke to 10 different dealerships – I didn’t state I actually physically visited them. That’s a fool’s game.

        Even a sales price way below invoice and holdback isn’t a net loss for a dealer in most cases. I can assure everyone they certainly don’t take losses on hot sellers like I wanted. The dealer gets that money back with the often 6 figure incentive checks they receive when the sales goal is reached. Another bonus comes for good dealer survey results. I worked in new car sales – I know how my bread was buttered. The industry doesn’t want people to know about this hidden margin, and I have a problem with that. So that’s why I spoke about that too.

        I’m sorry what I wrote was perceived as a slight. That was not my intent. My intent was to say no one seller will always beat another’s price, as the site owner claimed in this post. So it pays to shop around. Perhaps I shouldn’t have singled out Empire in my very specific example, and for that I’m truly sorry. I have actually referred people to Empire, which I wouldn’t have done if I didn’t think it worthwhile. At least one, Melanie B., visited them that I know of – perhaps they remember her. I wouldn’t make referrals to a business I intend to bash. And I clearly summed up my viewpoint by stating a place like Empire is the way to go for those who want to sign and drive on a decent deal without dealer hassle. [quote comment=”223538″]Let me set the record straight since you did come across as bashing my business. You did not give me exact options on the car. Yes you did give me paint color and said you wanted premium plus with navigation, and that pretty much was about it. The car I had priced you had more options than that. German car builds are not cookie cutter like Japanese cars where for the most part everything is included in a certain trim level. With German marks, options are a la carte, so most cars will not be built the same. From what you say that the residual became worse and you received a car with more options at a lower price does not make any sense at all. The small change in money factor would not offset a 1 point residual change.You did state that you went and spoke to 10 different dealerships and had them compete against each other. Your typewritten words, not mine.And yes, I do get pricing on various car brands at a loss. You are incorrect. I get pricing way way below invoice, more than you can ever get. Dealers go way beyond holdback in many cases to move cars in an effort to hit their monthly sales goals. So yes, they are giving me pricing at a loss.That is all I have to say.[/quote]

  3. briank says:

    This back and forth is why Tesla will make a huge impact, beyond the technological marvel that is the first gen Model S. No “stealership” hassles, foggy pricing, etc. Instead, go test drive the car, and if you like it order it online at home with the exact pricing and specs that you want. When the cheaper Model E comes, I hope Tesla “disrupts” the dealership experience even more as the price point comes down to more prospective customers. As much as I like my Audi, if I had a parking spot of my own, I would have a Model S right now.

  4. YouStayCl@ssyHoboken says:

    Here I initially thought the exchange between Empire and Craig-D was some new/slick marketing play..(not bashing but definitely a challenge that was met) Comments much appreciated from both sides!

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