Hoboken Liquor License Lunacy

2/11/2008:

From a Hoboken411 reader:

“One of my friends that has a local business today received an anonymous letter today in the mail concerning liquor licenses. The entire letter is anonymous, but raises certain questions about Hoboken and the “who do you know” people. Here is the letter below. I retyped since i don’t have a scanner, but it spoke very loudly how some conduct business in this town. Thought you would be interested to read it since your website seems to be most read in this town. Take a read:”

To all Liquor License Owners,

Last week, the Hoboken City Council announced it would consider issuing a liquor license to Danny Tattoli to be placed at 38 Newark Street. That is the old Clam Broth House. This would violate the law which states “you cannot have a license within 500 feet of an establishment with an existing liquor license”. This would set a terrible precedent. Would this enable other people to move or “acquire” a liquor license and move it to the location of their choice? Would his enable anyone to move next store to your establishment with their “new” license? If my license is in the northwest corner of the city and i want to move it to the heart of Washington Street will I now be able to do it? This will be a disastrous precedent. The council has stated they would consider this at a subcommittee on a meeting on February 14th, 2008. Please contact your council member in your ward to voice your displeasure or better yet you might want to contact a lawyer if this goes through. Try to attend and voice your opposition.

Hoboken Clam Broth House

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51 Comments on "Hoboken Liquor License Lunacy"


YipYap
Member
8 years 7 months ago

The new resturant is supposed to be very large and several floors a tri-level restaurant which will be 9,000 square feet, which is exceptionally large for a Hoboken restaurant.

Allot of money is at stake here over this liquor license.

nbm3
Member
nbm3
8 years 7 months ago
[quote comment=”67635″]My Family owns Giovanni’s Liquors on the corner of 9th and Madison. A couple of months after we opened our doors 5 years ago, the Shoprite across the street opened their doors and placed their liquor store on the same intersection where we are located. They placed entranced doors to their liquor store on 9th about 200 or 250 ft away from our front entrance, which have remained closed since then due to this law. The Shoprite was able to put their liquor store at this location because they argued that the entrance to their liquor store was through the front of the actual Shoprite, which is on the other side of the block and surpasses 500 ft. They did this probably hoping that they could run us out of business and then they could open up those doors on 9th. Yet we have remained and they still are not able to open those doors. We were told a couple of months back that Shoprite’s lawyers were trying to amend this law so that they would be able to open up these doors. As far as I know, they are still trying. If they are able to open, that would be disasterous for us and completely unfair. One thing is competition, but this does not constitute as that. Technically, we were there first and the law should not be changed, not even for a large corporation or a chain. But I am sure that they are aware of how… Read more »
girlboken
Member
girlboken
8 years 7 months ago
[quote comment=”67635″]My Family owns Giovanni’s Liquors on the corner of 9th and Madison. A couple of months after we opened our doors 5 years ago, the Shoprite across the street opened their doors and placed their liquor store on the same intersection where we are located. They placed entranced doors to their liquor store on 9th about 200 or 250 ft away from our front entrance, which have remained closed since then due to this law. The Shoprite was able to put their liquor store at this location because they argued that the entrance to their liquor store was through the front of the actual Shoprite, which is on the other side of the block and surpasses 500 ft. They did this probably hoping that they could run us out of business and then they could open up those doors on 9th. Yet we have remained and they still are not able to open those doors. We were told a couple of months back that Shoprite’s lawyers were trying to amend this law so that they would be able to open up these doors. As far as I know, they are still trying. If they are able to open, that would be disasterous for us and completely unfair. One thing is competition, but this does not constitute as that. Technically, we were there first and the law should not be changed, not even for a large corporation or a chain. But I am sure that they are aware of how… Read more »
strand tramp
Member
strand tramp
8 years 7 months ago

i walked past that building 2x a day for +10yrs…it was allowed to fall down by owner neglect. i don’t know personally about any construction in the basement but i do know that the 1st floor bars were all joined with fairly large openings cut into the brick between the buildings so that you could walk from bar to bar without going outside. mabye that was a problem? no idea, but it clearly was crumbling due to neglect. mabye the owner couldn’t afford to improve the building due to the low rent controlled revenue stream the apts generated?

moproteus
Member
moproteus
8 years 7 months ago

[quote comment=”67812″]
yeh, “serious” damage. If they can refurbish and reconstruct the train terminal, they could have fixed the minor buckling of one of the walls at the Clam Broth House. The buckling was the result of illegal construction in the building.[/quote]

[quote comment=”67822″]Yeah, apparently the buckling occurred due to some un-permitted work that had been done in the basement, I believe…
Regardless, this surely could have been fixed… But I guess since Danny Tattoli had the inside track to buy the property, Al Arezzo must have fast-tracked this building to get demolished so his pal could get the zoning approval to build bigger, etc..[/quote]

These guys are right. They did not have to tear the building down. It is more profitable to build condos in a higher building and get rid of old tenants in a building that are most likely paying lower rental rates than market.

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