Bike Nuisances in Hoboken

Other forms of bike nuisances prevalent in Hoboken

Last week we mentioned a few of the annoying bike nuisances in Hoboken. Such as over-zealous Lance Armstrong wannabe’s blocking the roads for drivers, to oblivious wrong way bicyclists.

But there are others we ought to point out…

“Mr. completely disconnected from reality”

Take a look at this guy. His offenses are absurd:

  • Riding on the sidewalk
  • Listening to music via earphones
  • AND TEXTING with his head down while in motion.

Guess nothing in the world is more important than this guy here. Nada.

bike nuisance in Hoboken texting and riding

Motorbikes are next!

Not sure if this “minibike” was battery or gas-powered – but just like those motorized delivery bikes that zoom around town – I can sense this cowboy-hat, day-bag wearing guy in a tense situation soon.

I don’t know – what would be an excuse that makes this justified? An injury? “He’s too busy to walk?”

I can bet if this keeps up, the stroller contingent will let him have it!

Motor Bike Nuisances in Hoboken NJ 14th Street

“Bike friendly” or Bike nuisances in Hoboken?

7/8/2014 Update:

Bike Nuisances or good for Hoboken NJEvery progressive person in the country seems to be “pro-bike” these days. Whether it’s because they think it’s a more “eco-friendly” mode of transport, or whatever “collectivist” bug bit them, the media, politicians and a whole lot of useful idiots people are supporting bicycles as a mode of transport. Fine. To each their own.

Certainly, we here at Hoboken411 feel KNOW we can get where we’re going a lot faster in Hoboken on our bikes. Mainly because because we know how to ride them.

Following “rules” like bike paths or street signals – honestly – are stupid. The two rules we follow (instinctively) are “survive” and “respect the heavier, faster, deadlier car.” Oh, and there is a third rule we follow because we’re not nuisances to society, which is: “we bike at our own risk,” meaning we won’t picket city hall, give the finger or yell at motor vehicles or sue anyone for anything.

Kind of a “Mad Max” mentality so to say.

However, the bike activists have (somewhat) succeeded in getting our streets peppered with (confusing to the average moron) bike lanes, and other special treatments supposedly designed to “make them safer.”

Well. We’re 100% certain that bike lanes do NOT help bikers here in this city. Take a look at this guy. Clearly a “career biker” with backpack, special bike shirt, and so-on. And even though he’s riding on Adams Street – one of the widest in town – still has double parkers.

What a nuisance! I had to drag along behind this slow-poke while he gleefully rode in his “special lane,” (don’t they have “special buses” for challenged children too?) while I contended with parallel parking cars, UPS drivers and more. When you see a 400hp German sports sedan behind you – for Christ’s sake, just get up on the sidewalk for half a block and move the fuck out of the way. At the very least, turn around and make a signal that you’re a bike-riding doofus, and you’re sorry for your state of being!

Bike nuisance lane in Hoboken NJ

Wrong way bikers don’t care either

To be honest, I’m torn on this one. I too have no issue riding the wrong way on a street in Hoboken. But I NEVER feel entitled to do so. I ensure that I’m out of the fucking way, or on the sidewalk briefly – especially if there is “a very large automobile” (as David Byrne said in “Once in a Lifetime”) coming my way.

But this lady was “La Dee Frickin’ Da-ing” down the street. Before I snapped this photo – she was in the MIDDLE of the street. I wonder if she’s already penned her last memoirs or something. Who knows. It was certain she wasn’t looking out for “Number One.”

We have more to say about certain modes of transportation coming up soon.

Bike Nuisance Wrong Way Biker Broad Hoboken NJ

8 Responses

  1. Gloria says:

    I nearly got run over by a battery powered delivery bike today. Those travel so quietly, when I turned to pick up my glasses which I dropped she almost took my head off. They have to stay off the sidewalks!

  2. Sphynx says:

    I ride a bike.

    I’ve come to admit that I dislike other cyclists. While I follow that laws, I don’t see anyone else following them.

    They ride on the wrong side of the road. They buzz passed pedestrians. They blow through stop signs and red lights. But I hope they stay on their bikes, because they will not be any better in cars. We already have enough drivers that roll through stop signs.

    Now on the subject of motorized bicycles. This is what the DMV has to say:

    Motorized bicycle (moped) license
    RELATED LINKS
    Moped Manual [pdf]
    Motorcycle Manual [pdf]
    A motorized bicycle (moped) is defined by law as a pedal bicycle with a helper motor, electric or gas-powered, capable of a maximum speed of no more than 25 miles per hour on a flat surface. A moped has a maximum displacement of less than 50 cubic centimeters (no more than 1.5 brake horsepower).

    How to get a moped license
    You must be at least 15 years old
    Visit an MVC Agency to complete an application for a moped permit.
    Pass the 6 point -ID requirements
    Pay $5 examination permit fee
    Pass the knowledge and vision tests to validate your permit. Study by reading the Driver Manual, Motorcycle Manual and Moped Manual
    You must practice with a permit for at least 20 days before being eligible to take the road test
    If you pass the road test, take your permit, ride slip and score sheet to an MVC Agency to receive your license and pay the $6 license fee

    Possible reasons you can fail the road test
    You lack the equipment required by state regulations
    Have no helmet
    Have unapproved goggles or face shield
    Your horn cannot be heard from at least 100 feet away

    I doubt any of these guys are following the law, but I don’t know how to bust them. There is never a cop around when you need one.

    • YouStayCl@ssyHoboken says:

      e-bikes aren’t motorized bicycles (they’re not mopeds). Electric or not, bicyclists often ride much faster than walking speed on sidewalks (so do joggers) and they can be a danger to inattentive pedestrians. Signage would be helpful, I think, along with active enforcement by HPD. I don’t know if we have an ordinance on the books against reckless cycling or speeding, however.

      If you have a driver’s license you don’t need a moped license. But you can’t register an e-bike as a moped so that point is moot.[quote comment=”223366″]I ride a bike.I’ve come to admit that I dislike other cyclists. While I follow that laws, I don’t see anyone else following them.They ride on the wrong side of the road. They buzz passed pedestrians. They blow through stop signs and red lights. But I hope they stay on their bikes, because they will not be any better in cars. We already have enough drivers that roll through stop signs.Now on the subject of motorized bicycles. This is what the DMV has to say:Motorized bicycle (moped) license RELATED LINKS Moped Manual [pdf] Motorcycle Manual [pdf] A motorized bicycle (moped) is defined by law as a pedal bicycle with a helper motor, electric or gas-powered, capable of a maximum speed of no more than 25 miles per hour on a flat surface. A moped has a maximum displacement of less than 50 cubic centimeters (no more than 1.5 brake horsepower).How to get a moped license You must be at least 15 years old Visit an MVC Agency to complete an application for a moped permit. Pass the 6 point -ID requirements Pay $5 examination permit fee Pass the knowledge and vision tests to validate your permit. Study by reading the Driver Manual, Motorcycle Manual and Moped Manual You must practice with a permit for at least 20 days before being eligible to take the road test If you pass the road test, take your permit, ride slip and score sheet to an MVC Agency to receive your license and pay the $6 license feePossible reasons you can fail the road test You lack the equipment required by state regulations Have no helmet Have unapproved goggles or face shield Your horn cannot be heard from at least 100 feet awayI doubt any of these guys are following the law, but I don’t know how to bust them. There is never a cop around when you need one.[/quote]

      • Sphynx says:

        I just posted what is on the State DMV. Are e-bikes pedal bicycles with a helper motor that is either gas or electric? [quote comment=”223367″]e-bikes aren’t motorized bicycles (they’re not mopeds). Electric or not, bicyclists often ride much faster than walking speed on sidewalks (so do joggers) and they can be a danger to inattentive pedestrians. Signage would be helpful, I think, along with active enforcement by HPD. I don’t know if we have an ordinance on the books against reckless cycling or speeding, however.If you have a driver’s license you don’t need a moped license. But you can’t register an e-bike as a moped so that point is moot.[/quote]

      • Sphynx says:

        Could you list some brands of e-bikes so I can be sure we are talking apples to apples?[quote comment=”223367″]e-bikes aren’t motorized bicycles (they’re not mopeds). Electric or not, bicyclists often ride much faster than walking speed on sidewalks (so do joggers) and they can be a danger to inattentive pedestrians. Signage would be helpful, I think, along with active enforcement by HPD. I don’t know if we have an ordinance on the books against reckless cycling or speeding, however.If you have a driver’s license you don’t need a moped license. But you can’t register an e-bike as a moped so that point is moot.[/quote]

  3. animal_lover says:

    It is interesting to watch the riders. I once saw one rider riding correctly and safely and that was at night in Louisville, KY. In your first pic the guy does not have a proper fit on his bike. The second is all geared up for touring and riding in the wrong direction. Some of the best are the parents leading the kids speeding down sidewalks or on roads passing light and stop signs.

    I would feel for the cyclist for having a council that allows this, except I am more concerned for the innocent pedestrians who is marginalized on the sidewalk and the driver who has to encounter these vehicles/bikes that are never held to the vehicle laws of the state.

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