Clothing Donations

2/7/2008:

Are clothing donations useful in disaster situations like the recent 1203 Washington St. or McSwiggan’s Fires? Where do they stand on the totem-pole of charity?

I only ask this because it seems as if clothing was no longer needed – and refused – rather quickly. Is this because so much was donated that they either ran out of room, or the demand dropped off? Or was it because the style wasn’t “good enough?” Or the wrong sizes?

While it was a few days behind, I had the opportunity to provide a truck-load of brand-name womens and mens apparel, but had no takers, and had to send the garments away.

I know that when there is a crisis, certain essentials are required, such as water, warm clothing and shelter. But perhaps every-day clothing is just not a good idea in Hoboken.

Money (mostly via bar-oriented fundraisers) seems to the perpetual winner here. Keep that in mind the next time disaster strikes, but I hope I still have the opportunity to help out.

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29 Comments on "Clothing Donations"


bradykp
Member
bradykp
8 years 3 days ago

[quote comment=”107088″]You can freecycle them:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/freecycle-hudsoncounty-nj/

The bins at Bed,Bath,and Beyond are not charities. They are for profit. Do not use them.[/quote]

you sure? it says goodwill on them i thought. but regardless, i’ve worked on “non-for-profit” audit clients, and they aren’t all they are cracked up to be either.

bradykp
Member
bradykp
8 years 3 days ago

[quote comment=”107244″]God bless you all for going about the proper donation methods. I find it too much effort.

Socks/stockings/unmentionables go in the trash. Anything else — if it has stains, it gets cut up for cleaning rags. Anything without stains goes out over the gate. Even old shoes put out on a sunny day will disappear within 24 hours.[/quote]

i dont do this because of an experience i had over by the goodwill bins. two ladies approached us as we were unloading our car and asked us if they could have the clothes instead of us putting them in the bins. they looked fairly decent, so I’m pretty convinced they are just trying to collect the clothes to sell them at a flea market or consignment. not my intent. i always drop them off at goodwill just to make sure they end up in the right hands at the end.

there’s a goodwill bin on observer, right by where you leave town to go to the 78/1&9….at that little mechanic’s place before the railroad bridge

elainetyger
Member
elainetyger
8 years 4 days ago

God bless you all for going about the proper donation methods. I find it too much effort.

Socks/stockings/unmentionables go in the trash. Anything else — if it has stains, it gets cut up for cleaning rags. Anything without stains goes out over the gate. Even old shoes put out on a sunny day will disappear within 24 hours.

Tama Murden
Member
8 years 4 days ago

Re 25.: There are, or used to be, charities that would access that by-the-pound deal, for clothes too worn for re-distribution. Not sure now. Perhaps a call to the Salvation Army or Goodwill might clarify? Or some on-line resource?

SFH
Member
SFH
8 years 4 days ago

I have a question regarding clothing donations…when I sort through old clothing, I will throw out anything that is very worn and threadbare. However, a while back I read an article that said you should still donate very worn clothing. The rationale for that was that charities will sell very worn clothing to rag dealers. It seems that charities get paid by the pound for very worn items. Does anybody know if this is true or do most charities just throw away threadbare items?

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