Heart Gallery: Adopt a kid!

1/23/2008:

A Hoboken411 reader thought this program is great.

There are many kids in New Jersey who have been in foster care for a long time, and for one reason or another are considered by the State of New Jersey as “hardest to place” in a permanent and loving home.

So whether you’ve decided that child-birth may not be for you, but still have room in your life to raise a decent kid, this might just be for you.

Read more about the Heart Gallery here, and see the latest gallery of kids in need here.

More about Heart Gallery, plus you can learn about Marc to get you started.

The Heart Gallery

heart-gallery-100-waiting-children.jpgThe Heart Gallery of New Jersey, Inc. is a unique not-for-profit corporation dedicated to raising awareness about foster children available for adoption. Through the volunteer efforts of some of the country’s most prestigious photographers, portraits are taken that help capture the individuality and spirit of each foster child who is eligible to be adopted. These photographs are then shared via the web and through gallery exhibits in the hope that potential families will be moved to inquire about adoption.

We’re pleased to introduce you to Marc and the other 99 children who comprise the “100 Waiting Children”, a Heart Gallery of New Jersey Special Exhibition. These children have lived in the New Jersey foster system the longest. Most are well into their teens and still long for permanent homes before they turn 18 years old. With the new addition of video bios, we think you’ll be amazed by their maturity, strength and overall, a longing for a forever family.

Meet Marc:

heart-gallery-marc.jpgMarc, 14, is at the age when he doesn’t like to talk much about his personal life. But press him, and you’ll see that he’s the quiet confident type. Don’t mistake it for mere coolness. After all, how many teenage boys admit they like looking in the mirror?

Due to his many losses and chaotic past, Marc is reluctant to let others get close. He is an energetic and dynamic athlete. He is an outstanding swimmer who excels at several sports. And he likes to sit around with his friends and talk about girls.

His case worker describes him as a natural leader. People flock to him.

He’s from a big family, with 16 children, and he recently connected with four older siblings. Maintaining contact with his siblings is very important to him.

But he’d settle for a smaller family – as long as there are pets.

Now that you’ve met Marc, why not take a moment to meet the rest of the 100 Waiting Children?

Leave a Reply

22 Comments on "Heart Gallery: Adopt a kid!"

parkave
Member
parkave

as per cat’s post re: open adoptions, many agencies do not require that right now. perhaps it was the particular agency cat’s friend went to. as you can see from the nj heart gallery, many of these children are older (mostly eight and up). these are children who have been free for adoption for some time because the parental rights were terminated. that means no contact with their bio parents. open adoptions are more relevant to babies — which, people are more interested in adopting. (sadly, because there are many older children who also need homes!)

i apologize for the long rambling posts. it is a subject i am passionate about… if you know of any STABLE people that would like to adopt/foster, please contact a nonprofit for more info. give these children hope.

parkave
Member
parkave

i agree with tama’s point (#16) regarding the way in which biffy initially tried to make a point. biffy, your second post was a lot more digestible and i mostly agree with it. the foster care system in this country IS a mess — dealing with it on a daily basis, i’m well aware of the cracks in it’s foundation. HOWEVER, i don’t think the ASPCA would do a better job finding these children homes…that is why they created childrens’ services.

it may be interesting to note that back in the day before child welfare agencies existed, children had fewer rights than animals (ie: mistreated animals received better care than mistreated children). the ANIMAL WELFARE field noted this and began to act on behalf of children – to advocate for children the way it did for animals. out of this effort came child welfare.

i believe that state agencies (such as DYFS) are greatly flawed in a number of ways i won’t go into here. however, many of the nonprofits out there are doing their best to assist these children. sadly, many of these organizations are greatly underfunded and don’t have enough volunteers to be foster parents. therefore, you have many foster children in inadequate homes. it is terrible, but a reality. many people are in it for the money, many others are in it because they have HUGE hearts and plenty of unconditional love to give. we love that second group…but they are hard to come by.

HHoney
Member
HHoney

[quote comment=”64025″]Biffy’s made excellent points in a funny way. IMHO, advertising cute kids for adoption is reminiscent of putting puppies in the window.

Changing the subject slightly, I knew a woman who wanted to adopt. She and her husband had one child of their own but had major fertility issues. They were young, affluent, employed, educated, etc., etc. When they looked into domestic adoption they were told that they would have to agree to an “open” adoption, where they basically would make the bio mother a part of their own extended family. They’d remain in contact with the baby’s birth family and raise the baby to know who his ‘real’ parents were, allow them IIRC nearly unlimited contact with the child, and so on. In exchange for this dubious privilege, they would have to undergo a series of intrusive interviews for like a year and then pay a lot of money.

I don’t know if all adoption agencies are like that, but if they are it doesn’t for a moment surprise me that more people opt for foreign adoptions.[/quote]Your story is not unusual in the US where babies are at a premium because so many couples (almost all affluent) are more focused on getting a baby than being a parent. It has to have that new car smell or it isn’t good enough.Not saying that is the case with your friends but that it is for many.

Tama Murden
Member

Re 17.: Point very well taken.

Cat
Member

Biffy’s made excellent points in a funny way. IMHO, advertising cute kids for adoption is reminiscent of putting puppies in the window.

Changing the subject slightly, I knew a woman who wanted to adopt. She and her husband had one child of their own but had major fertility issues. They were young, affluent, employed, educated, etc., etc. When they looked into domestic adoption they were told that they would have to agree to an “open” adoption, where they basically would make the bio mother a part of their own extended family. They’d remain in contact with the baby’s birth family and raise the baby to know who his ‘real’ parents were, allow them IIRC nearly unlimited contact with the child, and so on. In exchange for this dubious privilege, they would have to undergo a series of intrusive interviews for like a year and then pay a lot of money.

I don’t know if all adoption agencies are like that, but if they are it doesn’t for a moment surprise me that more people opt for foreign adoptions.

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